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Top 25 WWE Ladder/TLC/Money in the Bank Matches In History

December 10, 2014 By: Category: lists, WWE | Pro Wrestling

These Top-25 lists are picking up steam, so I’ll take the WWE approach of beating a good thing into the ground. With Money in the Bank coming up, it’s a good idea to look back at two decades-plus of WWE’s greatest ladder matches, and figure out what the best of the bunch truly are. There’s no bad matches to be found here; every entry is rewatchable time and time again. With TLC and Money in the Bank upping the ante of the classic ladder match, this list will cover a lot of ground, and no doubt provide a little argument fodder. Enjoy!

(Note: this list only includes matches which ended with the retrieval of a belt, briefcase, etc. As such, the TLC 2012 match with The Shield vs. Ryback and Team Hell No is excluded. Otherwise, it’d have likely been top ten).

25. Kane vs. Big Show vs. Matt Hardy vs. Drew McIntyre vs. Kofi Kingston vs. Cody Rhodes vs. Christian vs. Dolph Ziggler – Money in the Bank Ladder Match (Money in the Bank, July 18, 2010)

Firmly in the ‘let’s shoehorn gimmick matches into the secondary PPVs so that gimmick matches have less meaning’ era, Money in the Bank’s come away unscathed, thanks to the car-wreck spectacles that never get old. In this case, the maiden match of Money in the Bank’s spin-off event hit its mark, with a dose of big man psychology. Show and Kane were natural targets by the smaller competitors, while Show used a custom mecha-ladder for climbing.

24. Dolph Ziggler vs. John Cena – Money in the Bank Ladder Match (TLC, December 16, 2012)

Ziggler put his previously-earned briefcase on the line (stay tuned for that), and, as is modern custom, lost to Cena in several matches on Raw prior to the PPV contest. Just as naturally, Ziggler took his usual laundry list of wild bumps through the course of the match, before winning as a result of AJ Lee shoving Cena off the ladder. That’d be Ziggler’s lone win of relevance over Cena, but Dolph memorably cashed in four months later on Alberto Del Rio.

23. John Morrison vs. Sheamus – Ladder Match (TLC, December 19, 2010)

Forgotten in the dogpile beneath main event-and-celebrity over-focus, Morrison and Sheamus had themselves a nifty little feud late that year, and a title shot at The Miz was at stake. Akin to the Razor/Michaels matches of yore with the larger adversary throwing around the nimble stud, Morrison gradually overcame the odds and won in dramatic fashion after Sheamus attempted to tip the ladder. Sadly, the Morrison/Miz bout is just as forgotten as this great match.

22. Mr. Kennedy vs. Jeff Hardy vs. Matt Hardy vs. Edge vs. Randy Orton vs. CM Punk vs. King Booker vs. Finlay – Money in the Bank Ladder Match (WrestleMania XXIII, April 1, 2007)

Before Damien Sandow came along to look unceremoniously weak in failing in his cash-in against John Cena, there was Mr. Kennedy to lose his briefcase to Edge in a Raw quickie, following a Kennedy injury. The WrestleMania opener had plenty of intrigue, with a host of realistic winners. Jeff’s seated dive through Edge and a bridged ladder is cringeworthy, yet hilarious for the sight of brother Matt encouraging him to do it, then reacting as horror as Jeff lay hurt.

21. Dolph Ziggler vs. Damien Sandow vs. Tyson Kidd vs. Christian vs. Tensai vs. Santino Marella vs. Cody Rhodes vs. Sin Cara – Money in the Bank Ladder Match (Money in the Bank, July 15, 2012)

Another case of a heel being so much fun to watch that the crowd can’t help but cheer for them, the fans in attendance went berserk over Ziggler bumping Christian off a ladder in the end so that “The Show Off” could claim the briefcase. The match also seemed to be a coming-out party for Kidd, whose acrobatics finally had the forum for which to shine. Unfortunately, a torn meniscus sustained early in 2013 would sideline Kidd for almost a year, halting any push.

20. The Dudley Boyz vs. The Hardy Boyz vs. Edge and Christian – WWE World Tag Team Titles, Triple Ladder Match (WrestleMania 2000, April 2, 2000)

The ‘unofficial’ TLC match (the official moniker for such matches wasn’t coined until SummerSlam that year) was the brightest bulb of a shockingly-dim WrestleMania. A quiet crowd most of the night, the fans memorably buzzed for the Dudleyz setting up the table bridge across two ladders inside the ring. Some of the slower spots haven’t aged well, thanks to innovation and improvement, but there’s still plenty of sick spots to marvel at.

19. Edge vs. John Cena – WWE Heavyweight Title, TLC Match (Unforgiven, September 17, 2006)

A bit of a shocker when Edge went over Cena in Cena’s Boston backyard at SummerSlam, but that only meant Edge would return the favor in his native Toronto. The visual of Edge being AA’d off of a ladder through a double stack of tables would remain a fixture in WWE’s “don’t try this at home” PSAs for quite some time afterward. Seems as though out of all of Cena’s frequent opponents, only Edge matches CM Punk in creating consistent greatness with Cena.

18. Jeff Hardy vs. CM Punk – World Heavyweight Title, TLC Match (SummerSlam, August 23, 2009)

Given what a merchandise vessel Hardy had become for a company that loves its multiple revenue streams, it’s hard to believe Hardy would be gone by week’s end, with no return five years later. Punk’s victory transitioned into his tepid feud with The Undertaker, beginning immediately after the match as “The Dead Man” performed a supernatural body switch with a downed Hardy. In 2009, it was astonishing that Punk could win any PPV main event.

17. Christian vs. Alberto Del Rio – Vacant World Heavyweight Title, Ladder Match (Extreme Rules, May 1, 2011)

What a weird time period for WWE. Edge vacates the championship three weeks earlier upon his hasty, very real retirement, and a top contender’s match is made for the PPV. The crowd heavily bought into Christian, and a dramatic finish saw Edge providing timely interference to offset that of Ricardo Rodriguez and Brodus Clay. Christian winning the gold was possibly the biggest pop of his career, so naturally he lost the title to Randy Orton two nights later.

16. Paul London/Brian Kendrick vs. The Hardy Boyz vs. MNM vs. William Regal/Dave Taylor – WWE Tag Team Titles, Ladder Match (Armageddon, December 17, 2006)

Teddy Long punched up this one by adding the Hardyz and MNM, as well as the ladder modifier, seconds before the bell rang, I suppose in an effort to get non-buyers to purchase the show at about 8:23 EST. The match is most notable for Joey Mercury damn near getting his face grafted off in a see-saw spot gone awry, forcing him to wear facial contraptions for a time afterward. London and Kendrick retained in the midst of an 11-month reign the company barely promoted.

15. Daniel Bryan vs. Kane vs. Sheamus vs. Cody Rhodes vs. Justin Gabriel vs. Heath Slater vs. Sin Cara vs. Wade Barrett – Money in the Bank Ladder Match (Money in the Bank, July 17, 2011)

Takes a back-seat to CM Punk and John Cena’s all-timer to close the show, but it holds weight as the match that boosted Bryan into the main event tier where he’d more or less reside ever since. A wellness policy exodus played out as Sheamus powerbombed Sin Cara through a ladder, leading to a stretcher job into thirty days of oblivion for the luchador. Bryan’s victory was fairly unexpected, and the Chicago fans gave him a pop nearly comparable to Punk’s.

14. Bret Hart vs. Shawn Michaels – WWE Intercontinental Title, Ladder Match (WWE Challenge Taping, July 21, 1992)

The WWE’s first ever ladder match seems very tame compared to the anarchic stunt shows of later years, but two masterful workers in their relative youth put together a dramatic series of ‘near-falls’, with the match more about the drama of the climb instead of insanity. Hart purportedly suggested the match to Vince McMahon, who asked for a demonstration at this TV taping. The match made it onto several video releases, and became a tape-trader’s bounty.

13. Randy Orton vs. CM Punk vs. Daniel Bryan vs. Sheamus vs. Rob Van Dam vs. Christian – Money in the Bank Ladder Match (Money in the Bank, July 14, 2013)

In a roundabout way, this match made it possible for Daniel Bryan to stand tall at the end of WrestleMania XXX, holding two World Titles aloft (although the Rumble was definitely the fuse). The best ladder match in the spinoff PPV’s history began with a hero’s welcome for the returning RVD, and culminated with Paul Heyman turning on Punk, just prior to Orton’s victory, which was confusing at the time, but became much clearer following SummerSlam.

12. The Rock vs. Triple H – WWE Intercontinental Title, Ladder Match (SummerSlam, August 30, 1998)

A year later, Rock was a mega-babyface that transcended the business, while Triple H would be the slimy villain he was born to play. Here, however, was the match that virtually shot both men into the main event for good. In front of a nuclear Madison Square Garden crowd, Rock about blew the domed roof off with a People’s Elbow while Helmsley lay prone on the oddly-yellow ladder. HHH’s win only freed up Rock for the World Title run we all saw coming.

11. Chris Jericho/Chris Benoit vs. The Dudley Boyz vs. The Hardy Boyz vs. Edge/Christian – WWE World Tag Team Titles, TLC Match (SmackDown, May 22, 2001)

A worthy sequel to Benoit and Jericho’s heart-stopping title win over Steve Austin and Triple H one night earlier, an irate Vince McMahon booked the new champs against the TLC Six on free television. WWE Network, assuming it survives the long haul, will eventually have this episode up, as the match is otherwise lost to history thanks to Benoit’s involvement. A shade below the original TLC battles in terms of overall quality, it’s still one of the best ladder matches ever.

10. Seth Rollins vs. Dean Ambrose vs. Jack Swagger vs. Kofi Kingston vs. Dolph Ziggler vs. Rob Van Dam (Money in the Bank, June 29, 2014)

The best of both worlds for WWE: a spotfest with some truly innovative moments (Rollins getting back-dropped onto a ladder bridge/puzzle structure) and a great storyline threaded through (Ambrose attempting to kill Rollins for breaking up the Shield). Kingston and company took turns keeping the pulse going while Ambrose, selling a dislocated shoulder, refused to let Rollins win. Kane tombstoned Ambrose to end the Ahab-like endless chase, and Rollins won to build on a genius heel turn.

9. The Hardy Boyz vs. Edge and Christian – Ladder Match (No Mercy, October 17, 1999)

Hanging above the ring was a bank robber’s sack of cash, and the winner would win Terri Runnels’ managerial rights. If it was believed that the winners would be elevated by association with Terri, the four just elevated themselves with a performance for the ages, becoming made men to varying degrees. Interesting note: Edge came dangerously close to missing the match, as he was almost unable to fly to the show due to a hurricane (he lived in the Bahamas at the time).

8. Eddie Guerrero vs. Rob Van Dam – WWE Intercontinental Title, Ladder Match (Monday Night Raw, May 27, 2002)

Easily the best ladder match in Raw’s history, even if Undertaker and Jeff Hardy’s clash a month later received more company hype, despite it being a dramatic finish to an average match. This match was so good, even a moronic fan running interference couldn’t ruin it. RVD regained the gold, leading into the post-match involvement of Steve Austin, who went after Guerrero, only to be thwarted by a returning, suddenly-heel Chris Benoit; an angle that ended up fizzling.

7. Edge vs. Chris Jericho vs. Chris Benoit vs. Kane vs. Christian vs. Shelton Benjamin – Money in the Bank Ladder Match (WrestleMania XXI, April 3, 2005)

The first of its kind remains the best of its kind. From Benjamin’s hands-free ladder ascension to Benoit German-suplexing Jericho, who was holding a ladder, it’s possibly the most uncluttered Money in the Bank match ever, and one that didn’t overstay its welcome. It’s also arguable that Edge’s eventual cash-in on John Cena was the most relevant of its kind, since nobody had ever seen a cash-in until he did it nine months later. Anything since dilutes the fun to a degree.

6. Chris Benoit vs. Chris Jericho – WWE Intercontinental Title, Ladder Match (Royal Rumble, January 21, 2001)

There’s a moment of retroactive horror in the body of the match, wherein Benoit goes for his patented headfirst dive to the floor, only for Jericho to wallop him upside the head with a jarring chair shot. If seeing that moment overrides any possible enjoyment you can derive from the art of the match, it’s understood. For the more unmoved, it was a viable candidate for 2001’s match of the year, rivaled by a litany of classics, one of which is to come.

5. Shawn Michaels vs. Razor Ramon – WWE Intercontinental Title, Ladder Match (SummerSlam, August 27, 1995)

Gorilla Monsoon’s first act as figurehead President was to remove Psycho Sid from SummerSlam, and give Razor the shot at Michaels’ gold, in the match they put on the map. Wise choice; it boosted the show into pretty good territory, rare air in 1995. Ramon played de facto villain, smashing Michaels’ knee to pieces with the ladder, before Michaels superkicked him off a second ladder. The botched ending, and Michaels’ tantrum, somehow adds to the charm.

4. The Dudley Boyz vs. The Hardy Boyz vs. Edge and Christian – WWE World Tag Team Titles, TLC Match (WrestleMania X7, April 1, 2001)

From the greatest WrestleMania ever comes the ideal spotfest: accelerated, minimal set-up for the convoluted spots, and the type of chaos that comes from involving a few intruders. Nominee for the best bump visual in ladder match history: Bubba Ray Dudley and Matt Hardy smashing four tables into dust after an interfering Rhyno tipped a painter’s ladder over. Edge and Christian’s win was a bit anti-climactic, but you can’t discount the efforts before then.

3. Edge and Christian vs. The Dudley Boyz vs. The Hardy Boyz – WWE World Tag Team Titles, TLC Match (SummerSlam, August 27, 2000)

Gets the slight nod over its WrestleMania kid-brother for the sole reason of a less rushed ending. Conventional wisdom had the Hardyz going over here in their home state of North Carolina. In defeat, Jeff busted out a frightening Swanton Bomb off a ladder on the floor through Bubba Ray Dudley. The match is also known for an unfortunate double-entendre that Jim Ross made about Edge and Lita that gained new perspective about five years later.

2. Chris Jericho vs. Shawn Michaels – World Heavyweight Title, Ladder Match (No Mercy, October 5, 2008)

Doesn’t stand out, but it should. In fact, a lukewarm crowd is possibly all that kept this from the number one spot. Jericho and Michaels’ hate-filled feud in 2008 came to a head with this match, which was less about cutesy spots, and more heavy on the “I’m gonna kill you” brutality. Indeed, most of the ‘spots’ were Jericho and Michaels trying to make the other suffer, without the need for Rube Goldberg-esque contraptions. An inexplicably undervalued masterpiece.

1. Razor Ramon vs. Shawn Michaels – WWE Intercontinental Title, Ladder Match (WrestleMania X, March 20, 1994)

Like Savage and Steamboat, a newer fan may wonder what’s so special about this match, after seeing many a stuntshow since. For 1994, Ramon and Michaels put together a match just unheard of for the time, and wouldn’t become standard for a few years yet. Michaels took at least five or six crazy bumps off of Ramon’s power-based offense, and the dramatic near-finishes had the MSG crowd buying into every second. It’s still the gold standard.

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Fans Are Too Quick To Side With WWE Against CM Punk

December 03, 2014 By: Category: WWE | Pro Wrestling

CM Punk has went and done it again. That’s right folks, the guy that shoots straight from the hip has done just that again and he’s turned the pro wrestling world upside down. Only this time he didn’t do it from the Monday Night Raw stage, he did it from Colt Cabana’s pod cast.

And yes, he’s ticked everyone off. Again. But now instead of having his back and supporting him, a lot of fans are turning on him. Let’s be honest, they’re turning on him by the truckload. But why is that? Why are so many fans siding with WWE over this?

Before anyone accuses me of drinking Punk’s Kool-Aid, let me assure you I know the deal. He may not have competed in a WWE ring for 10 months but that doesn’t change the fact that Punk is still a pro wrestler at heart. And pro wrestlers work you. They work you all the time.

When a heel glares at you and dares you to hit him, he’s working you. When a babyface reaches out to shake your hand, he’s working you. When John Cena holds up his cute little rally towel, he’s working you. Everything a talent does is a work; everything is done in an effort to get over, to sell merchandise and most importantly, sell himself.

So is Punk trying to sell himself right now? Yes. Of course he is. But to what length, that is the question. The fact is that despite how much Punk’s character may be coming into play; he’s basically got nothing to gain by lying. Think about that for a minute.

If he lies, if he slanders WWE or anyone in it, then he has to know there will be repercussions. He has to know that Vince McMahon’s company will rain hell down on his head the likes of which he has never seen before. Punk surely would’ve heard from WWE’s attorneys within 24 hours of his interview and at this point, we would all be talking about just how much this was going to cost him.

He knows that, right? This is not the case of one guy slamming another guy in a shoot interview, this is not sour apples from a Superstar that just never got his break and now he’s complaining about it. This is a former top guy who did it all in the business, going live and taking his case to the people.

Punk could’ve sold his story to the highest bidder. He could have sat down with Jim Rome and opened up about the company that he broke himself in half for, the same company that supposedly fired him via FedEx on his wedding day. Punk could have asked for air time on virtually any platform he wanted and he probably would have gotten it.

But he didn’t. The truth is that he has nothing to gain by working you. He’s not trying to sell T-Shirts, he’s not trying to sell DVDs and he’s not trying to sell a new movie. He doesn’t care if you hate him and he doesn’t care if you buy the WWE Network. Oh and news flash; he’s also not trying to get back in WWE.

This is a guy that with the exception of the occasional sound byte, basically kept his mouth shut for nearly a year after he walked out. He could have taken to Twitter the second after he hit the door and burned WWE down to the ground, if he had wanted to.

But instead, Punk went home. He went home, he got married and he got happy. Punk is not really that much of a pro wrestler anymore; he’s just a guy talking to his best friend about what happened to him in his last job.

Too naïve? Too simplistic? Maybe so. But no matter how you look at it, it’s hard to fully believe WWE is not at least partially to blame for what happened with Punk. After all, this is a pro wrestling promotion and pro wrestling promotions work their talent. They work them all the time.

Guys are overworked. That’s a fact and no one needed CM Punk to tell them that. The men and women that step into the ring for WWE are dollar signs to the company, they are the earners and the product they manufacture is their matches.

They put their bodies on the line every time they perform and they’re the ones that the company depends on to keep the money coming in. No matches equals no fans obviously, so the talent is absolutely essential to keeping WWE afloat. Without the sweat equity of the workers in the ring, there is no WWE.

So it goes without saying that the company will get as much out of its talent as physically possible. It happens all the time and honestly, that much will probably never change. But the Superstars in WWE are not only overworked, they are worked as in lied to; constantly.

Is this a surprise to anyone that has been a fan for longer than 15 minutes? Just because WWE is a publicly traded company and refers to its content as “sports entertainment” does not change the fact that they are a pro wrestling promotion. And pro wrestling promotions will do whatever it takes to put on the most profitable show possible.

If that means overworking its talent, then that‘s what happens. If that means stretching the truth or flat out lying, then that will happen too. Not everyone’s story can end as happily as Mick Foley’s did. CM Punk’s obviously didn’t. So does that mean that he’s lying? Does that mean he kept his mouth shut for 10 months to just suddenly pop up and work all of us? Is Punk selling himself with no apparent profit, nothing to gain, because he‘s bitter at not having worked the main event match at WrestleMania?

I have no idea; I’m not directly connected to the situation. But I will say that he is very convincing. And I will also say that to see fans stand against him when 10 months ago they cheered him, believed in him and supported him is ridiculous. To see them siding with the company instead of the talent that makes it happen in the ring, not behind the scenes in the boardroom is pathetic.

CM Punk may never work in a WWE ring again. For that matter, he may never work in a pro wrestling ring again. Believe him, don’t believe him, either way he’s probably done. And when it comes down to the company versus the talent, I will support the talent practically every time. So to answer your question yes, the Kool-Aid is delicious.

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CM Punk Speaks On WWE Departure, Will Never Return

November 27, 2014 By: Category: WWE | Pro Wrestling

You knew he wasn’t going to keep his mouth shut forever. CM Punk has finally broken his silence and speaking up about what led him to quitting the WWE. I think it’s safe to say you can cross Punk back in WWE off of your wish list for 2015.

Ten months after walking out of the WWE 30 minutes before a RAW broadcast, Punk has given his first wrestling interview where he opened up and told his side of the story regarding his WWE exile. Punk gave the exclusive to his old buddy Colt Cabana on the Art of Wrestling podcast and what an exclusive it was.

Punk said the reason he quit was all due to his deteriorating health. He told Cabana that he had been wrestling with broken ribs, bad knees, and suffered a concussion at the Rumble. It had been widely reported that Punk was badly beat up around that time but I don’t think anyone realized how badly he was hurting. Punk said that he had a fever and no appetite for months. Punk also took a shot at the company and made a dig about his paychecks shrinking.

I think the most damning thing Punk said about the company was in regards to his concussion. Punk said he suffered the concussion in the Rumble. Punk said he finished the Rumble with the injury. Punk said that he passed the WWE concussion test the next day, which had also been reported. Punk then said what I think could be the most damaging thing of the entire interview in that he questioned the credibility of the WWE concussion test. He called it “bullsh*t.” Punk also noted that the company showed no concern over his concussion and were more worried about him obtaining Visas and taking a drug test for upcoming tours.

That is big. Keep in mind that this allegation comes just several weeks after the company evaded a potential public relations fallout from the Alberto Del Rio firing. The WWE proudly take credit for their head-injury and concussion program. Punk also brought up several instances where the company pressured him to work injured. Punk is the first major star to come out and question the authenticity of the program. It will be very interesting to see if any of the media or any of the WWE’s partners follow up on this. Maybe not, but there is potential some real fallout here.

Punk took credit for the Shield. He said he came up with the idea. He said it was proposed that he be with Daniel Bryan, the Big Show, and Seth Rollins. He didn’t like that. He proposed Dean Ambrose, Seth Rollins, and Chris Hero as the Shield. Vince said no to Hero and Roman Reigns wound up in the group. He is happy for their success but was upset that all of the credit has gone to Triple H in putting the Shield together.

Punk also said that he had an idea about reinventing his character. His new character would wear fighter shorts with sponsors. He said he had a big sponsor lined up that would have made him a lot of money and opened up opportunities for the other wrestlers to get sponsored. He went to Vince and Vince told him no, citing the current sponsors would get upset. As luck would have it Brock Lesnar came in a few months later with sponsors on his fighter shorts/trunks. When he went to Vince and told Vince it was his idea Vince laughed at him. He didn’t understand the difference between he and Brock and told Vince that he should have been let go if he wasn’t a superstar.

He was also upset that Vince wouldn’t let him walk out with Chael Sonnen on a UFC show. He said that Vince said no and said that UFC was barbaric, he was appalled that women were fighting in the UFC, and told Punk that someone was going to die in there. Punk told Vince that Owen died in his ring. He said a week later that Triple H walked Floyd Mayweather out for his fight. Punk was not happy.

He said he tried to get the finish changed for his match with the Rock at the Royal Rumble 2013 and tried to ride the title reign through Mania. Punk didn’t want to turn heel at the time but Vince told him he needed to turn heel to work the Rock. He didn’t want to turn heel so his choices were either Daniel Bryan beating him for the title or him turning heel and wrestling the Rock. He said he suggested that they go into WrestleMania with a Triple-Threat Match with Rock vs. Cena vs. Punk. He offered to get eliminated quickly but he called it a “mind f*ck” never being in a Mania main-event. He also suggested that he retain the title and go to WrestleMania for a Streak vs. Streak match with the Undertaker. Vince turned that down. I actually blogged on that at the time and pointed out the missed opportunity between the streak vs. streak gimmick. He is also still angry at losing to the Rock and the Undertaker.

The WrestleMania main-event or lack thereof seemed to be a real problem over his last year. Punk told Colt that he did a lot of favors for Vince, including coming back early to work Jericho and do the program with Paul Heyman and Brock Lesnar. He said that Vince would constantly tell him, “we owe you one.” He felt that by doing a bunch of favors that he would get his Mania main-event. He said that when he watched Mick Foley’s DVD and Vince said that he felt bad he never gave Foley a Mania main-event and he did, that Vince would have the same feelings for Punk. He obviously didn’t and wasn’t going to get it and the repeated theme throughout the interview indicates it really played a big part in his decision to leave.

He was also upset about a movie project falling through. He said he signed on to do the 12 Rounds movie that Randy Orton did. He said he agreed to it  but had a conversation with Triple H about a conflict in his schedule. The European tour was on the schedule and he felt as champion he should be on tour. He said that Hunter didn’t think the schedules conflicted. He said that Hunter said he would check the schedule and get back to him. Punk said he then found out online that Randy Orton got the part and nobody ever informed him about it.

Punk went into detail about his last hour or so in the WWE. Punk said he told Vince McMahon and Triple H he was going home. Punk then told Cabana that he told off Triple H for stifling his momentum in 2011. He also said that he complained to Vince for killing his creativity. He said he told them both that it was garbage that Daniel Bryan wasn’t in the WrestleMania 30 main-event.

Punk said that he was actually fired from the WWE and he never quit. Punk said Vince was in tears when he left and hugged him goodbye. Punk said he never heard a word from him and then a few weeks later Vince text him and told him he was suspended. He then said he was delivered termination papers for a breach of contract on his wedding day. He said that the WWE were afraid he was going to go to TNA. He said that eventually both sides settled on a settlement that gave him more than what he wanted. He also said that he despises wrestling and would never go back. He said that he refused the WWE’s request to issue a joint statement on their settlement.

This certainly gives a different spin to the story that was coming out of the WWE side the last several months. According to the WWE side, Punk was upset about his place on WrestleMania, didn’t want to work with Triple H and so he quit. He did confirm that it was true but it was only a part of the problem. Nothing has ever been said about his health other than he passed a concussion test the night he quit. Hearing Punk’s side of the story certainly gives me a different take on the whole situation.

One thing I will say is that Punk recently blasted his fans on Twitter asking him to come back. He compared himself to Barry Sanders and said something along the lines of fans don’t care about his health. Let’s call a spade a spade here. Punk probably treats his fans worse than any other WWE superstar on the roster. There are all kinds of reports of Punk being rude to his fans. Punk himself even told fans to stay away from him in a Comic Con Q&A whereas you have a guy like Randy Orton who said on TMZ that he wants fans to know he is approachable. To each their own but he clearly separated CM Punk and Phil Brooks from his fans and when he is outside of the ring he doesn’t want to be bothered, so why should they care about Phil Brooks?

At the end of the day I think it is clear that no matter what anyone wants to think, Punk is not coming back now, next year, or ever. I think it is time for WWE crowds to stop the chants and appreciate the years you had with him. Maybe he changes his mind in a few years but it would appear at this point in time that CM Punk is officially retired and retired for good.

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WWE Survivor Series 2014 Predictions and Preview

November 20, 2014 By: Category: WWE | Pro Wrestling

For the first time in almost a decade, the WWE Survivor Series 2014 is headlined by its traditional 10-man elimination tag team match. Team Cena will take on Team Authority in a match with big stakes for one team and Team Helmsley-McMahon.

The good news is that the ten-man elimination tag team match is back as a Survivor Series headliner. The bad news is well…a ten-man elimination tag team match is headlining the 2014 Survivor Series. What made this match so much fun twenty-years ago was that you had dream teams assembled on both sides. Unfortunately competition has given way to parity and a ten-man team today resembles something more like an undercard battle royal.

While we are currently looking at one match on paper, this event is clearly a one-match show. Whether it is creative burn out, a holding pattern, or the attitude that the fans are getting this one for free, the lineup this year leaves a lot to be desired. I have already blogged extensively on that so I won’t go too deep into it here. These last couple of years of parity have left the company with no depth which becomes clear in these kinds of matches.

I am only going to pick with the top matches as the undercard is fairly irrelevant on this show. Now that I have gotten you pumped up for the event, let’s get into the matches and make some picks!

Team Cena (John Cena, Dolph Ziggler, Big Show, Erick Rowan and Ryback) vs. Team Authority (Seth Rollins, Kane, Mark Henry, Rusev and Luke Harper) in a Traditional Survivor Series elimination tag team match; if Team Authority loses, they will no longer be in power. If Team Cena loses, all team members will be fired from WWE

I do want to say something positive about this match. It has enormous potential to be a lot of fun. There are some real solid workers here, some who rarely get this kind of opportunity to shine. Unfortunately some of those guys will probably have quick exits due to the nature of the match. However, some may be given time, especially if they survive deep into the match to tear make an impact and tear the house down.

In case you missed it, a new stipulation was added to the match which deems that every member of Team Cena will be fired if Team Cena loses. I think the fact that the stipulation will be added only two days before the event tells you everything you need to know about the importance. Let’s be honest. Nobody other than some new younger fans are buying this stipulation and the fact that it was a mere throwaway tells me that the WWE doesn’t believe it will draw any more interest to the match.

I predict that this one will come down to Cena and Rowan vs. Rollins, Harper, and Rusev. I would have to guess that Harper and Rowan will have some cool stuff planned. I was fairly confident before the new stipulation that the match would finish with Rusev beating Cena. Rusev has to remain strong, so does Cena, but there is a potential WrestleMania match to start building with these two. I can’t imagine the stupidity in booking Cena to beat Rusev but where else do they go here? Cena needs to stay strong going into the Rumble so I think he wins.

I wouldn’t be surprised whatsoever to see Randy Orton cost Rollins the match. You’d almost expect some payback at this show from Orton and they are in St. Louis. My new prediction is Cena winning by eliminating Rollins thanks to interference from the Viper. There is no other city in America that they can count on better than Orton’s hometown to give him a huge pop and put this angle over. I don’t know what this accomplishes other than furthering an angle between the Authority vs. Vince McMahon for Mania.

Dean Ambrose vs. Bray Wyatt

I don’t know how they did it but the WWE has done a tremendous job of killing any potential interest I had in this feud. The promos thus far have been lame and I am still trying to figure out why Wyatt interfered at Hell in a Cell. I think this feud continues through the Rumble which makes me think that Wyatt gets the win here with Ambrose getting his win back on the next show.

AJ Lee vs. Nikki Bella for the WWE Divas title

Who would have expected to see this much Nikki Bella in the ring? Even more strange is that she has actually turned into a decent wrestler. There are a ton of rumors out there that indicate AJ is leaving after this show. I think where there is smoke there is fire but what about Brie? This match sets up a perfect scenario where Brie costs Nikki the title. I think the WWE pull a swerve here and put AJ over, knowing the rumors are out there and save AJ’s loss for an event in the near future.

Gold and Stardust (c) vs. The Usos (Jimmy Uso and Jey Uso) vs. Los Matadores (Diego and Fernando) vs. The Miz and Damien Mizdow in a Fatal 4-Way tag team match for the WWE Tag Team Championship

I have no problem watching the Rhodes brothers wrestle the Usos again but this one can get a little hairy. These matches can be either really good or a real cluster. I think it will be decent as you have a lot of solid workers in here to keep it together. I think the WWE recognizes that they have something brewing with The Miz and Mizdow. For whatever reason and I have no idea why, they have caught on, mostly due to the fans enjoying Mizdow. So why not book a title change here? I think Miz and Mizdow leave St. Louis with gold.

Full WWE Survivor Series 2014 card and matches…
Team Cena (John Cena, Dolph Ziggler, Big Show, Erick Rowan and Ryback) vs. Team Authority (Seth Rollins, Kane, Mark Henry, Rusev and Luke Harper) in a traditional Survivor Series elimination tag team match; if Team Authority loses, they will no longer be in power. If Team Cena loses, all team members will be fired from WWE.
AJ Lee (c) vs. Nikki Bella for the WWE Divas Championship
Dean Ambrose vs. Bray Wyatt
Gold and Stardust (c) vs. The Usos (Jimmy Uso and Jey Uso) vs. Los Matadores (Diego and Fernando) vs. The Miz and Damien Mizdow in a Fatal 4-Way tag team match for the WWE Tag Team Championship
Alicia Fox, Emma, Naomi and Natalya vs. Paige, Cameron, Layla and Summer Rae in a Divas Traditional Survivor Series elimination tag team match
Fandango vs. TBA

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Top 25 WWE Survivor Series Elimination Matches

November 19, 2014 By: Category: lists, WWE | Pro Wrestling

Survivor Series just ain’t what it used to be.

First, it was Thanksgiving night. Then it was Thanksgiving eve. Then it moved indiscriminately to just any old Sunday in November. When it started, it was all about the elimination matches. Now it’s about the typically-rushed storylines that are often back-burnered in favor of whatever Cena or Orton are doing, with maybe an elimination match or two shoehorned in there somewhere.

Well, forget about senile Vince McMahon and lack-of-fun Kevin Dunn for a minute. Let’s journey back to when the event MEANT SOMETHING, and let’s share some fond memories of some of the greatest elimination matches that have ever taken place at the Thanksgiving night/eve/located in proximity to the holiday tradition!

After all, it sure beats “John Cena and The Rock vs. what’re-their-names.”

Enjoy!

25. The Holly Cousins and Too Cool def. Edge, Christian, and The Hardy Boyz (11/14/99, Detroit, MI)
Survivor: Hardcore Holly
Gotta admit; that face team would be pretty cool in any era, despite the real life problems of the brothers Hardy. For what it is, it’s a fast paced match between WWE’s “X Division” of 1999; a match in which the second oldest person (Crash) was only 28 years old. When does that EVER happen? Edge being the first one gone was a surprise, as was the heels going over. Then again, since Edge and company were made men after their spectacular ladder match the previous month, why not give some rub to the then-relevant “Big Shot”? Christian’s near-comeback from a three-on-one was fun to watch.

24. Bertha Faye, Aja Kong, Tomoko Watanabe & Lioness Asuka def. Alundra Blayze, Sakie Hasegawa, Kyoko Inoue & Chapparita Asari (11/19/95, Landover, MD)
Survivor: Kong
This was probably the first time since 1988 that WWE had more than three women involved in the same match, and boy, what a comeback for women’s wrestling. Of course, the entire division was scrapped a month later, when Blayze rechristened herself as Madusa and threw the WWE Women’s Title in the trash on WCW Nitro. Alas. The match was a ten minute infomercial for Aja Kong to show how scary-dominant she could be, dropping her fellow Joshi performers on their heads and necks before waylaying Blayze with a spinning back fist to become the sole survivor. Now we get Kelly Kelly rubbing her bony ass in Natalya’s face. Alas.

23. Kurt Angle, Chris Benoit, John Cena, Bradshaw, and Hardcore Holly def. Brock Lesnar, Big Show, A-Train, Matt Morgan, and Nathan Jones (11/16/03, Dallas, TX)
Survivors: Benoit, Cena
Lesnar built a team of brawny monsters to take on GM Paul Heyman’s “most wanted” list. It was notable because, unlike today with Cena and Randy Orton, the two men getting the biggest rub (Angle and Lesnar) were eliminated before the finish, thus making whoever survived look pretty damn special. Indeed, the soon-to-be-megapushed Benoit and the being-molded Cena upended Big Show in the end, after Benoit had made Lesnar tap out. Of course, this is essentially the match that kicked off Cena’s interminable face run, so maybe some of you will want to curse this outing.

22. Shawn Michaels, Triple H, CM Punk, and The Hardy Boyz def. Edge, Randy Orton, Johnny Nitro, Gregory Helms, and Mike Knox (11/26/06, Philadelphia, PA)
Survivors: the entire team
One sided as it was, this match provided some decent crowd-pleasing action, as well as a number of comedy spots. Mike Knox being eliminated by Shawn Michaels in under a minute, and then Shawn asking his team, “Who was he?” is never not funny. “I think he’s on ECW.” “Oh, so we’re doing GOOD then?” Too hilarious. Also of note was Punk outpopping the entire team during the pre-match DX intro, despite having only been in WWE for three months. It’s stuff like that that drives Vince McMahon even more insane.

21. Wade Barrett, Cody Rhodes, Dolph Ziggler, Jack Swagger, and Hunico def. Randy Orton, Sheamus, Kofi Kingston, Sin Cara, and Mason Ryan (11/20/11, New York, NY)
Survivors: Barrett, Rhodes
It was a pretty good way of putting over Intercontinental Champion Rhodes and soon-to-be pushed heel Barrett (before his arm injury in February). Orton dispatched a drained Ziggler early before Barrett’s team rattled off 4 straight eliminations, leaving Orton alone against 4 men. Swagger went quietly, then Hunico was RKOed out before the Viper was outsmarted, losing to Barrett’s Wasteland.

20. The Miz, Sheamus, Jack Swagger, Dolph Ziggler, and Drew McIntyre def. John Morrison, Matt Hardy, Evan Bourne, Shelton Benjamin, and Finlay (11/22/09, Washington, DC)
Survivors: Miz, Sheamus, McIntyre
Other than McIntyre’s push stalling in 2010, that heel side is like “Team Groom for Greatness”, as the other four men would all go on to hold a World Title. Whereas the face team features three men no longer in WWE, one suspended for ingesting synthetic ganja, and a captain who is a kitty-whipped laughingstock. Regardless, the match was a tremendous showcase of midcarders soon-to-be big deals, which gives Survivor Series (as well as the Royal Rumble) its ochre of flavor. The highlights were McIntyre nearly breaking Bourne in half at the neck with his Future Shock DDT, and Sheamus definitively crushing Finlay in the “Battle of the Brogue.”

19. Davey Boy Smith, Jim Neidhart, Doug Furnas, and Phil Lafon (Team Canada) def. Vader, Steve Blackman, Marc Mero, and Goldust (Team USA) (11/9/97, Montreal, PQ)
Survivor: Smith
Team Canada, it should be noted, featured only one actual Canadian in Lafon. On the night where Bret Hart would be excommunicated from WWE canon, it seemed appropriate that a hastily-assembled team of America haters would be on display. The match was merely a backdrop to begin a feud with Vader and the increasingly-erratic Goldust, who walked out without ever tagging in, but the match was an exciting wrestling exhibition when Vader, Mero, Smith, Furnas and Lafon were involved. Having a pro-Canuck team in an enthusiastic Canadian setting provided a hot crowd as well, even if the match was overshadowed at night’s end by…..well, you know.

18. Ted Dibiase, Rhythm & Blues, and a Mystery Partner (The Million Dollar Team) def. Dusty Rhodes, Koko B Ware, and The Hart Foundation (The Dream Team) (11/22/90, Hartford, CT)
Survivor: Dibiase
Assuming that Honky and Neidhart are future Hall of Famers, as well as the mystery partner, you have eight Hall of Famers in one match. Impressive, no? Anyway, you probably know by now that said mystery partner is The Undertaker, making his WWE debut in grand fashion by obliterating Ware and Rhodes before taking a countout loss to save his mystique. Hart lost his brother Dean the day before to kidney failure, and Roddy Piper (on commentary) declared “The Hitman” had dedicated the match to him. Foreshadowing his eventual singles push, Hart came back from three on one to tussle with Dibiase at the end, losing when the Million Dollar Man rolled through his cross body.

17. Randy Savage, Jake Roberts, Brutus Beefcake, Ricky Steamboat, and Hacksaw Jim Duggan def. Honky Tonk Man, Ron Bass, Harley Race, Hercules, and Danny Davis (11/26/87, Richfield, OH)
Survivors: Savage, Roberts, Steamboat
The first Survivor Series match ever had one of the more intriguing stories ever seen at the event. Honky, Intercontinental Champion for six months running and an unlikely champion at that, was versed by five challengers, all of whom capable of beating him for the gold, if not for Honky’s perpetual luck and knack for cheating. Honky’s teammates weren’t able to go the distance, as Honky found himself stuck with the three men he had feuded with through 1987, and they all still held a grudge. After trying his best to hang with Savage and his cohorts, Honky took a walk for the countout loss. By the way, wouldn’t YOU have loved to see Savage and Steamboat as a semi-regular team? Me too.

16. Randy Savage, Hulk Hogan, Koko B Ware, Hercules, and Hillbilly Jim def. Big Bossman, Akeem, Ted Dibiase, Haku, and The Red Rooster (11/24/88, Richfield, OH)
Survivors: Savage, Hogan
Koko and Rooster main evented a WWE PPV not called “Royal Rumble” or “Irony-Mania”. The Towers were positioned as holdover threats to Savage and Hogan before the “Mega Powers Exploding” months later. Hogan being handcuffed late in the match while Savage had to try and fend off Bossman and Akeem provided some tension to a well-worked, albeit predictable, affair. The sad part was Dibiase, the hottest heel when the year started, reduced to working a nothing angle with former “slave” Hercules, and then floating around with nothing to do for months until he was handed the Jake Roberts feud. Other than such quibbles, it was a fine main event to the Series’ second incarnation.

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15. The Ultimate Warrior, Jim Neidhart, and The Rockers (The Ultimate Warriors) def. Andre the Giant, Haku, Arn Anderson, and Bobby Heenan (The Heenan Family) (11/23/89, Chicago, IL)
Survivor: Warrior
I love when you look back at old matches like this and realize that WWE and Vince McMahon were giving experimental runs to those deemed to have “future prospects.” This particular match was the closer for the 1989 Survivor Series, and Warrior was given a chance to shine as the final act, foreshadowing his World Title run the following year. In addition, Shawn Michaels lasted quite a while in the match for a 24-year-old tag team wrestler, getting to pin Haku before succumbing to Anderson’s spinebuster. Surely with Marty Jannetty eliminated, the match became something of a singles audition for the future Heartbreak Kid. For those wondering why Heenan was in the match, check Tully Blanchard’s drug test results for an explanation.

14. Kofi Kingston, Christian, Mark Henry, MVP, and R-Truth def. Randy Orton, CM Punk, Cody Rhodes, Ted Dibiase, and William Regal (11/22/09, Washington, DC)
Survivor: Kingston
Quite the anachronism in 2011, Orton pinned Henry within the first minute, Orton and Punk worked in tandem, eventual main eventer R-Truth bit the dust early, and Orton Punk were both reviled villains to Christian’s virtuous good guy routine. But rather than expose the fallacies of WWE’s breakneck booking change, let’s look at the upside: Kingston was made with this one, withstanding seven minutes of Punk and Orton breaking him down, to score what should have been a career-boosting victory. Instead, he blew the finish weeks later in a triple threat involving Orton, and Orton had an on-camera freakout that got Kofi punished, but not Randino. Weird.

13. Razor Ramon, 123 Kid, Davey Boy Smith, and The Headshrinkers (The Bad Guys) def. Shawn Michaels, Diesel, Owen Hart, Jim Neidhart, and Jeff Jarrett (The Teamsters) (11/23/94, San Antonio, TX)
Survivor: Ramon
You can be made in a loss, and Diesel was a made man after this performance. After lots of early action in which everyone but Michaels got involved, Diesel said “enough of this” and went on a rampage. Fatu bit the dust with a Jackknife, followed by Kid, then Sionne, and then the Bulldog took a count out loss. With Razor remaining, against 5 on 1 odds, a loss seemed inevitable when Michaels FINALLY tagged in and accidentally superkicked Diesel. In a silly finish, all five heels were counted out when Diesel angrily stalked Michaels. Razor became the only sole survivor in history to never eliminate anyone and, three days later, Diesel beat Bob Backlund to become WWE Champion.

12. Andre the Giant, King Kong Bundy, Rick Rude, One Man Gang, and Butch Reed def. Hulk Hogan, Bam Bam Bigelow, Paul Orndorff, Don Muraco, and Ken Patera (11/26/87, Richfield, OH)
Survivor: Andre
Sorry, Jim Crockett Promotions. When cable providers had to choose between airing Starrcade ’87 and the inaugural Survivor Series, with the lure of Hulk and Andre in the main event, facing off eight months after WrestleMania III, WWE won out in spades. After the sides whittled down to a three on two, Hogan and Andre finally locked horns, but the Hulkster was counted out after Bundy and Gang kept him from re-entering the ring. Bigelow managed to eliminate Bundy and Gang and would have defied the odds Cena-style but, well, it was Andre. The Frenchman flattened Bammer for the final fall, giving himself a just cause to petition a rematch against Hogan for the WWE title. And that’s a fascinating story in itself.

11. Doug Furnas, Phil Lafon, and The Godwinns def. Owen Hart, Davey Boy Smith, and The New Rockers (11/17/96, New York, NY)
Survivors: Furnas, Lafon
After a cup of coffee in ECW in the fall of 1996, Furnas and Lafon debuted in the opening match of Survivor Series 1996, and what a debut it was. Once Marty Jannetty busted his ankle prior to being eliminated, and then both Godwinns went, WWE was in store for action that they’d never seen before. Leif Cassidy (known better as Al Snow) took a header with modified reverse superplex from Lafon, and the well-traveled veterans were made to hold off Hart and Smith, then WWE Tag Team Champions. Bulldog was cradled for elimination, and Furnas planted Owen with an absolutely vicious release German suplex to give Furnas and Lafon the win with a crazy standing ovation from the Garden crowd.

10. The Rock, The Undertaker, Kane, Chris Jericho, and Big Show vs. Stone Cold Steve Austin, Kurt Angle, Rob Van Dam, Booker T, and Shane McMahon (11/19/01, Greensboro, NC)
Survivor: Rock
It was an abrupt end to what should have been a money-maker for WWE. The WCW/ECW Invasion had sputtered to a poorly-booked finish, but at least we got a great finale out of it. With the future of the company at stake, and the losing side being forced to disband for good, drama built over the forty-five minute coda. Once down to just Rock and Austin, after Jericho attempted to selfishly maim his own partner, the two icons of the Attitude era put on a dramatic finish, ending with Angle proving to be a mole, as he clocked Austin with a title belt. One Rock Bottom later, and the Alliance was dead, leaving Stephanie to scream like a banshee in tears backstage.

9. The Powers of Pain, Hart Foundation, The Rockers, The British Bulldogs, and The Young Stallions def. Demolition, The Brainbusters, Los Conquistadors, The Fabulous Rougeau Brothers, and The Bolsheviks (11/24/88, Richfield, OH)
Survivors: Powers of Pain
When was the last time WWE had ten teams, REAL teams, under lock and key like this? This would be the second time a match with ten teams would take place (I do believe this spoils a later entry), and it was full of great action and well-told stories. The climax was an inexplicable story turn in which Mr. Fuji intentionally caused Demolition, the World Tag Team Champions, mind you, to be counted out, just so he could manage the Powers of Pain for some reason. In other fascinating notes, the Conquistadors, perennial jobbers, lasted over forty minutes, and the Rougeaus were eliminated early due to a very tense real-life feud with Dynamite Kid.

8. Randy Orton, Chris Benoit, Chris Jericho, and Maven def. Triple H, Batista, Edge, and Gene Snitsky (11/14/04, Cleveland, OH)
Survivor: Orton
Kicking off one of the greatest five-month story arcs ever seen in WWE history (I’m serious), Orton led his team to victory in a match where the winning side got to run Raw for one month while Eric Bischoff took a long vacation. In the end, it would lead to Batista realizing he could beat Triple H and thus slowly turned on him before brutalizing him for the World Heavyweight Title at WrestleMania 21. Sadly, though, this match didn’t make Orton the top babyface star that Vince McMahon was hoping for, but lord knows they’d try again year after year. Highlight of the match is Maven busting Snitsky open with a stiff right hand, and Gene getting his revenge with a chair shot that just about killed the Shop-At-Home star.

7. Ric Flair, Ted Dibiase, The Warlord, and The Mountie def. Rowdy Roddy Piper, Bret Hart, Davey Boy Smith, and Virgil (11/27/91, Detroit, MI)
Survivor: Flair
What a great beginning, what a lousy finish. Talk about your impressive lists of talent for one match, with the exception of Warlord, who at least provided a musclehead to throw people around and create “ooooh” moments with. Even Virgil in 1991 had hit a nice stride. Smith and Warlord are both eliminated after a Flair cheapshot causes Bulldog to go, and then Hart duplicates the act on Warlord, allowing Piper to pin the big man. The match then ends in a bizarre multi-man count out, with Flair being the only man to beat the count back inside, thus cheaply becoming the sole survivor. It was a shame, because the match was turning into something AWESOME, aided by a white-hot crowd. What a pity.

6. The Shield and The Real Americans def. Rey Mysterio, Cody Rhodes, Goldust, and The Usos (11/24/13, Boston, MA)
Survivor: Roman Reigns

Easily the best elimination match in nearly a decade, WWE gave a Booking 101 demonstration on how to portray a wrestler as a killer. After Dean Ambrose, Cesaro, and Jack Swagger bit the dust, Reigns went ballistic, thinning the field of Rhodes and Jimmy Uso. Seth Rollins bounced Jey Uso out before getting downed by Rey. Down two-on-one, an undaunted Reigns plowed through Goldust and Mysterio in a 30-second span to stand tall. The action along the way was the fast-paced fare you’d expect, given the entrants, but letting one man, one not named Cena or Orton, obliterate so many opponents gave hope that Reigns would become a power player.

5. Skip, Rad Radford, Tom Pritchard, and 123 Kid (The Bodydonnas) def. Marty Jannetty, Barry Horowitz, Hakushi, and Bob Holly (The Underdogs) (11/19/95, Landover, MD)
Survivor: Kid
Imagine in 2011 if they put the likes of Daniel Bryan and other barely-seen, improperly-used talents in one twenty minute match and told them “go nuts.” In this opening match to the 1995 show, fast-paced athletes like Hakushi, Jannetty, and Kid wowed the crowd in spectacular fashion with action that Vince McMahon wasn’t exactly used to putting on. Let’s just say Vince bellowed “WHATAMANEUVER” a lot. After Jannetty finished Skip off with a top rope powerbomb (unheard of in WWE at the time), Kid used help from new stablemate Psycho Sid to finish Jannetty, continuing his remolding into one of Ted Dibiase’s corporate players.

4. Batista, Rey Mysterio, Randy Orton, Bobby Lashley, and JBL (Team Smackdown) def. Shawn Michaels, Kane, Big Show, Carlito, and Chris Masters (Team Raw) (11/27/05, Detroit, MI)
Survivor: Orton
The in-ring action for this one was superb, as you had wrestlers who didn’t even LIKE each other railing off creative double teams for the greater good of brand supremacy (you know, when the brand extension WASN’T a bastardized concept meant to make people care about a draft from year to year….). But as fun and different as the in-ring action was, the action at the commentary desks was even better, as Michael Cole and Tazz sniped with Joey Styles (remember him?), Jerry Lawler, and Jonathan Coachman for the entire match in between calling moves. For once, it seemed like Vince McMahon stepped away from the headset and just let their barbs come naturally, and it was FUN. In the end, Michaels took out Mysterio and JBL, but the RKO got him moments later. Then The Undertaker returned. Great stuff.

3. Razor Ramon, Macho Man Randy Savage, Marty Jannetty, and 123 Kid def. IRS, Diesel, Rick Martel, and Adam Bomb (11/24/93, Boston, MA)
Survivors: Jannetty, Kid
A major substitution took place before the card, as Savage was called in to pinch hit for Mr. Perfect, who either bowed out due to recurring back problems or alcoholic issues, depending on which source you believe. Regardless, the action was raucous for the first fifteen to twenty minutes, with Diesel, Savage, IRS, and Razor, the four bigger players involved, being eliminated. Once down to the monstrous Bomb and wily Martel against two smaller competitors, it seemed that Kid and Jannetty had little chance. This was especially true after Bomb gave Kid a sickening slam on the concrete after a plancha gone bad. However, after a half hour of action, Kid and Jannetty ended the contest with matching sunset flips on both men to become unlikely survivors.

2. Strike Force, Young Stallions, Killer Bees, British Bulldogs, and the Fabulous Rougeau Brothers def. Hart Foundation, Demolition, The Islanders, The New Dream Team, and The Bolsheviks (11/26/87, Richfield, OH)
Survivors: Stallions, Bees
The original twenty-man elimination contest features WWE talents at their most innovative. In a match with Bret Hart, Dynamite Kid, Davey Boy Smith, Tito Santana, and others, this should not be a surprise. Hard to say what was better: Haku nearly decapitating Dynamite with the savate kick, or Paul Roma saving Jim Powers with a top rope sunset flip on Valentine to eliminate him. This match has literally everything: crisp finishing sequences, top-notch wrestling, good swerves (Strike Force, the champs, were eliminated not fifteen minutes into the forty minute match), and a nice underdog finish, as Jim Brunzell pinned Bret Hart, allowing the Bees and Stallions to outsmart the brawnier Islanders en route to victory. If you love tag team wrestling, hunt down a copy of this event, because this match will be your Graceland.

1. Chris Jericho, Christian, Randy Orton, Mark Henry, and Scott Steiner (Team Bischoff) def. Shawn Michaels, Booker T, Rob Van Dam, and The Dudley Boyz (Team Austin) (11/16/03, Dallas, TX)
Survivor: Orton
If Austin’s team were to be victorious, he, as co-GM of Raw, would be allowed to use martial law to keep order on the show (i.e. beat people up). However, if Bischoff’s team won, Austin was out as co-GM. The match began innocuously enough, with Henry, Booker, Steiner, and RVD going, and then Michaels hit a gusher outside the ring, with blood spilling everywhere. Seriously, it looked like he was going to die any second. Jericho and Christian finished off the future Team 3D, and Austin’s hopes were now pinned on a crimson-soaked zombie. Oh, the drama! A fluke Sweet Chin Music took Christian out, and a cradled reversal of the Walls doomed Jericho. Michaels heroically hung in there against a fresh Orton, and the ref was soon knocked out. Austin and Bischoff interjected themselves, and Austin chased Bischoff to the entrance set and thrashed him good, but Batista then jumped the rail, pancaked Michaels with the Batista Bomb, and the ref came around to count Orton’s pinfall, leaving a stunned Austin in the aisleway. Had Austin been gone for more than four months after this, and not returned as the “Sheriff”, it’d have meant a lot more. Instead, it was just a great match, one in which the drama and story meant more than any chain-wrestling sequence could ever mean.

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Top 20 WWE Greatest Survivor Series Teams Ever

November 13, 2014 By: Category: lists, WWE | Pro Wrestling

After a quarter century-plus of WWE Survivor Series matches, wherein teams of 4, 5, or even 10, try to outdo one another in the name of survival bragging rights, certain teams have stood out above the fray as being the most powerful and memorable. Here’s 20 of the all-time greats, with no real criteria in place, except the gut feeling of “how awesome were they?”

20. Owen Hart’s Team (1996)
Members: Owen Hart, British Bulldog, The New Rockers
Result: Lost (Opposing Survivors: Doug Furnas and Phil Lafon)
Why They Were Great: For the most part, this was just a hastily thrown together team that had but one purpose: make Furnas and Lafon look like the world-beaters they could be.

But as far as “workrate” battles go, Hart, Bulldog, and Leif Cassidy (Marty Jannetty was gone early) made proficient tackling dummies for Furnas’ suplexes and Lafon’s strikes. Cassidy was floored by an insane inverted superplex from the Frenchman, and Furnas nearly decapitated Owen with a throwing German suplex, giving two new faces the best WWE debut you could ask for.

19. The Royals (1995)
Members: King Mabel, Jerry Lawler, Hunter Hearst Helmsley, and Isaac Yankem DDS
Result: Lost (Opposing Survivors: The Undertaker, Fatu, Savio Vega, Henry Godwinn)
Why They Were Great: Another “patsy” team whose only objective was to get killed by The Undertaker one by one until Mabel, who crushed The Dead Man’s eye socket weeks earlier, ran away in terror after becoming his team’s last hope.

What was most impressive of this team was its lasting power. In the Attitude Era, Helmsley and Yankem would be rechristened Triple H and Kane, and become among the era’s biggest stars. Lawler and Mabel (then Viscera) would stick around as well. Amazingly, all four men would be in WWE in 2008, the year of Big Vis’ final release. Perhaps no other team has had the longevity of the Royals.

18. Team Miz (2009)
Members: The Miz, Sheamus, Drew McIntyre, Dolph Ziggler, Jack Swagger
Result: Won (Survivors: Miz, Sheamus, McIntyre)
Why They Were Great: I admit to being a fan of teams that feature a host of breakout stars before they broke out; the ‘before they were stars’ squads. Miz’s team was comprised of himself (then-United States Champion), and four men who, outside of some developmental false starts, had really all debuted in the past year.

Miz, Sheamus, Swagger, and Ziggler would all be World Champions within the next year and a half (Sheamus the following month), while McIntyre would go on to become Intercontinental Champion for over five months. The team they beat was, appropriately, built from stars that had seen good runs already (John Morrison, Matt Hardy, Finlay, Shelton Benjamin, and Evan Bourne), so “putting over” the new class made sense.

17. The Heenan Family (1989)
Members: Andre the Giant, Bobby Heenan, Haku, Arn Anderson
Result: Lost (Opposing Survivor: The Ultimate Warrior)
Why They Were Great: Perhaps no other team would be as deserving as the moniker of Dos Equis’ Most Interesting Team in the World. There isn’t a single boring personality on display here; no wasted space.

If the four men were to collectively write a book about their life’s experiences, what would be the best section: Andre’s drinking stories and Hollywood run-ins, Arn’s days of partying with the Horsemen and other wild characters in Atlanta, Haku’s tales of maiming idiots who dare test his toughness, or Heenan’s take on the sport, laced with his one-of-a-kind spit-take-inducing humor?

16. Hardy Boyz/Dudley Boyz (2000)
Members: Jeff Hardy, Matt Hardy, Bubba Ray Dudley, D-Von Dudley
Result: Won (Sole Survivor: Jeff Hardy)
Why They Were Great: WWE had two undeniably-great tag team runs: the latter half of the 1980s, and the early 2000s. In the second example, the Hardyz and the Dudleyz represented two-thirds of the division’s most renowned pairings, thanks to their participation in several breakthrough ladder, table, and ladder/table/chair matches.

At this respective ‘peak’ of their tag team careers, the quartet faced off with the other representative of their pantheon, Edge and Christian, as well as Right to Censor members Bull Buchanan and The Goodfather. The current TNA World Champion found himself remaining with Christian and Goodfather, overcoming interference from Val Venis to eliminate the former pimp, and survived.

15. The Shield/Real Americans
Members: Dean Ambrose, Seth Rollins, Roman Reigns, Antonio Cesaro, Jack Swagger
Result: Won (Sole Survivor: Reigns)
Why They Were Great: Never before had one Survivor Series team been so rooted in the cyber-savvy indy scene, with Ring of Honor and Combat Zone Wrestling well-represented. The rec-center crowd could beam proudly, seeing Tyler Black, Jon Moxley, and Claudio Castagnoli plugged into classic WWE fare, while CM Punk and The American Dragon tagged elsewhere on the card. Makes Kevin Steen’s signing this year less surprising.
The match was more about putting over the killer edge of Reigns, and did a finer job of making the Shield’s muscle into a superhero as a heel than anything they’ve done since the group’s June 2014 split. Still, all three Shield members are treated like a big deal, all rightfully so, no matter how you feel about Reigns’ rocking chair-wooden dialogue. It’s essentially a dream team for the cool-heel lover.

14. Team Austin (2003)
Members: Shawn Michaels, Rob Van Dam, Booker T, The Dudley Boyz
Result: Lost (Opposing Survivor: Randy Orton)
Why They Were Great: Had this team existed in 1998, its cultural impact would have been even greater than it is here. Between Attitude pioneer Michaels, crowd-favorite Booker, and ECW cornerstones RVD and the Dudleyz, Stone Cold Steve Austin had five fine representatives for an elimination match with high stakes.

In what would end up being, in this author’s opinion, the greatest elimination match in Survivor Series history, Austin’s group waged war with a fivesome selected by Eric Bischoff. In the end, a hopelessly-bloody Michaels eliminated Christian and Chris Jericho, and then nearly ousted Orton before Batista (not in the match) illegally attacked him. Orton scored the pin, and Austin, as a result, was fired (albeit temporarily).

13. Team SmackDown (2005)
Members: Batista, Rey Mysterio, JBL, Randy Orton, Bobby Lashley
Result: Won (Sole Survivor: Orton)
Why They Were Great: It was the only elimination match at the underrated 2005 event, but it was one of the most fun ones of its kind. Smackdown’s group faced a team of five representing Raw; one which had a little less star power (Shawn Michaels, Big Show, Kane….then Carlito and Chris Masters). The end result was a wildly fun match, where even the sniping commentary between the two tables helped steal the show.

As for SmackDown’s team, talk about some impressive star power. Raw had the disadvantage of some of its stars taking part in other matches (John Cena vs. Kurt Angle, Triple H vs. Ric Flair), so Smackdown had the quality advantage. Batista was World Champion at the time, JBL and Orton were part of the main event scene, and Mysterio, after Eddie Guerrero’s passing, was on the verge of being a main eventer himself.

12. The Radicalz (2000)
Members: Chris Benoit, Dean Malenko, Eddie Guerrero, Perry Saturn
Result: Won (Survivors: Benoit, Saturn)
Why They Were Great: The foursome represented one particularly rusty nail pounded into the coffin of WCW. Their collective release from the company 10 months earlier not only cost WCW its backbone of hard work and crisp wrestling, but added that backbone of hard work and crisp wrestling to WWE, fortifying perhaps their most impressive roster ever.

Although the fate of the group as a whole has changed the opinions of certain members (only Malenko has made it largely unscathed), in their collective prime, The Radicalz represented wrestling’s in-ring elite. WWE made them even better by shading them in with personality, whether it was Benoit as a ruthless competitor, Guerrero as a comical womanizer, or Malenko as a stoic ladies man. As for Saturn, well…what do you know about Moppy?

11. Team Piper (1991)
Members: Rowdy Roddy Piper, Bret Hart, Davey Boy Smith, Virgil
Result: Lost (Opposing Survivor: Ric Flair)
Why They Were Great: Admittedly, the quality of Survivor Series had dipped from previous years, as evidenced by a putrid contest between teams captained by Hacksaw Jim Duggan and Colonel Mustafa, as well as a drag-asstic four-team match notable only for planting the seed of Shawn Michaels’ heel turn. This match, however, saved the show, along with Undertaker’s first World Title win.

The team, Virgil included, largely represented WWE’s babyface upper midcard of the time period, as Bret was Intercontinental Champion, Bulldog was a capable competitor, Virgil had his best run, and Piper always had that star quality. Even their opponents were a damn fine team, making them entry 11b on this list: Ric Flair, Ted Dibiase, The Mountie, and The Warlord. Shame the match ended with a cheap disqualification.

10. The Teamsters (1994)
Members: Shawn Michaels, Diesel, Owen Hart, Jim Neidhart, Jeff Jarrett
Result: Lost (Opposing Survivor: Razor Ramon)
Why They Were Great: Speaking of cheap endings, after Ramon’s four partners were eliminated by Diesel, “The Bad Guy” became the first wrestler to be his team’s sole survivor without eliminating a single opponent. That’s because a miscue between Michaels and Diesel led to all five villains being counted out in the most unique Survivor finish to date.

But what a roster The Teamsters boasted. Michaels and Diesel were then-Tag Team Champions, and just months away from co-headlining WrestleMania against each other. Owen was wrapping up a feud with brother Bret, and Jarrett was on his way to becoming Intercontinental Champion. One has to wonder where the “Teamsters” name came from. It wasn’t as if they were a union threatening to shirk their duties or anything.

9. The Alliance (2001)
Members: Stone Cold Steve Austin, Kurt Angle, Booker T, Rob Van Dam, Shane McMahon
Result: Lost (Opposing Survivor: The Rock)
Why They Were Great: Despite representing a storyline that would infuriate smarks and marks alike with its dullness and lack of drama, given its magnitude, the WCW/ECW hybrid group was reduced to basically Booker and Van Dam in starring roles, with the infusion of established WWE icons that “jumped ship”, thus killing the specialness of the invasion.

But still, on paper, The Alliance was very well represented. Austin was WWE Champion, Angle was his fiercest rival at the time (revealed to be a mole at the match’s conclusion), Booker and RVD saw significant time on Raw and Smackdown as the standouts of the 2001 acquisitions, and even Shane had credibility as a bump machine that freely got his ass whipped against the likes of Angle and Rock that year.

8. Team Powers of Pain (1988)
Members: Powers of Pain, Hart Foundation, Rockers, British Bulldogs, Young Stallions
Result: Won (Survivors: Powers of Pain)
Why They Were Great: Here’s a good argument for the proliferation of tag teams and a solid division: in 1988, there were ten tag teams that competed in this one match, and none of them had names like “(Blank) and (Blank)”. They were all legit duos, many of them over with the crowd, but most importantly, they ended up creating stars.

On this one team, you had Shawn Michaels, Bret Hart, and Davey Boy Smith, who would all help carry the company during its darkest times in the mid-90s. Out of these tandems came the stars of the future, and working tags only made them better rounded performers. Factor in Dynamite Kid and Marty Jannetty, and that’s some pretty impressive technicians on one team.

7. Edge and Christian/The Hardy Boyz (1999)
Members: Edge, Christian, Jeff Hardy, Matt Hardy
Result: Lost (Opposing Survivor: Hardcore Holly)
Why They Were Great: As I said in the previous example, tag teams round out performers and create better wrestlers out of them. You’ll find no better example of this in the Attitude Era and beyond than the men who made the tag team ladder match famous. All four men would go on to hold some form of a World Title, or top brand title, in their careers.

Coming together out of respect, this foursome absolutely made themselves with both their daredevil antics, and their youthful vibrance. Edge and Christian would turn heel shortly thereafter, and complete their personas with their self-deluded “gnarly dude” act, while the Hardyz would ride their life-on-the-edge bend to equal stardom.

6. Team DX (2006)
Members: Shawn Michaels, Triple H, CM Punk, The Hardy Boyz
Result: Won (Entire Team Survived)
Why They Were Great: If I could have the collective sum of all five men’s merchandise sales throughout their five WWE careers, I’d never have to work again. Also, I could buy TNA and make Repo Man champion, just to amuse myself. Talk about your collection of diverse, while altogether similar talent that each won over scores of fans.

Even WWE must’ve known the lure of Punk and the Hardyz; usually Shawn and Hunter would’ve remained standing on their own against Edge and Randy Orton’s team. Yet there’s the Straight Edge Superstar and Cameron, NC’s most famous brothers, helping rid Gregory Helms and Johnny Nitro. Shawn Michaels’ elimination of Mike Knox ranks as the funniest moment in the history of the event.

5: The All-Americans (1993)
Members: Lex Luger, The Undertaker, Steiner Brothers
Result: Won (Sole Survivor: Luger)
Why They Were Great: The team reads like the upper midcard of a WCW show in early 1990, but things changed with the former (and future) Turner talents under WWE’s banner. To battle a cliched team of evil foreigners (from horrid places like Japan, Canada, Finland, and Hawaii), Luger amassed a team of two collegiate athletes and a zombie mortician.

But jokes aside, given the limitations of WWE’s roster at the time, this was a pretty impressive team. Undertaker replaced Tatanka, who was injured by Yokozuna and Ludvig Borga, but it was done for the better, in my eyes. Luger/Taker/Steiners was kind of a poor man’s equivalent of Hogan/Andre/US Express 1985, but at least this team was aided by Taker’s super-sweet Colonies jacket. LET FREEDOM RING.

4. Team WWF (2001)
Members: The Rock, Chris Jericho, The Undertaker, Kane, Big Show
Result: Won (Sole Survivor: Rock)
Why They Were Great: It made sense for Vince McMahon to program the best possible group against The Alliance with the futures of both warring sides on the line. After all, when the opposing team featues Austin, Angle, Van Dam, and Booker for a killer blowoff, you need all the star power you can get as a counter punch.

On this team are five men who will all, most assuredly, be in WWE’s Hall of Fame, provided they don’t do anything irreversible to their loved ones. The match also had the benefit of furthering the budding rivalry between Rock and Jericho, which provided us with a number of awesome matches between two of the era’s most charismatic stars. The benefit of less Survivor matches is more star-studded teams.

3. The Hulkamaniacs (1989)
Members: Hulk Hogan, Jake Roberts, Demolition
Result: Won (Sole Survivor: Hogan)
Why They Were Great: For the most part, each team in 1989 had some weak links that would prevent them from making this list. Yeah, Roddy’s Rowdies had Piper and Jimmy Snuka, but the Bushwackers are grounds for disqualifcation. The 4X4’s boasted Jim Duggan and Bret Hart, but Ronnie Garvin and his upside-down toilet brush hairdo (credit: Bobby Heenan) were a dealbreaker.

Not the case with Hogan’s team. Jake Roberts was at his peak as a babyface, feuding with Ted Dibiase after the Million Dollar Man injured his neck. Demolition were the WWE Tag Team Champions on their last great run, and Hogan was the company’s lead dog. He would finish off Zeus here, and in a cage match shortly thereafter, before putting on one of his finest performances ever against the Ultimate Warrior months later.

2. Team Savage (1987)
Members: Macho Man Randy Savage, Ricky Steamboat, Jake Roberts, Brutus Beefcake, Hacksaw Jim Duggan
Result: Won (Survivors: Savage, Steamboat, Roberts)
Why They Were Great: If WWE had a midcard this sustained and deep today, you’d hear far less complaints from know-it-all fans. Savage and Steamboat on the same team is always a win, but factor in Roberts, Beefcake, and Duggan in their physical primes (as well as arguable peak of fanhood), and you can understand the high ranking.

Amazingly, Savage would feud with each of his teammates in high-profile fashion at some point. His legendary issue with Steamboat is a given, but he also feuded with Roberts in 1991 in one of WWE’s raciest stories ever. Macho Man would also battle Duggan in 1989 over the “crown”, and Beefcake was was Hogan’s ally in the post-Mega Powers explosion.

1. The Warriors (1990)
Members: The Ultimate Warrior, Kerry Von Erich, Legion of Doom
Result: Won (Sole Survivor: Warrior)
Why They Were Great: Here’s a case where the team name befit all of the members: Ultimate Warrior, Modern Day Warrior, and Road Warriors. Had Von Erich not been a worn-down shell of his once Greek God self, this team would have been flawless from head to toe. As it is, it’s still the greatest Survivor Series team of all time.

Just the combination of Warrior, at his peak as WWE Champion, and the LOD, the most popular tag team ever, is enough to warrant a top spot. Fans of all ages appreciated the three face-painted gladiators that ripped opponents to shreds with ease. Factor in Von Erich as Intercontinental Champion, and you get a team that has no lack of prestige.

The Randy Savage Story DVD

Randy Macho Man Savage Collector’s Edition Box Set

WWE The Paul Heyman Story

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WWE The Attitude Era: Volume 2 DVD Review

November 10, 2014 By: Category: Videos, WWE | Pro Wrestling

WWE Attitude Era Vol,. 2The latest installment from the WWE’s love affair with its favorite period is the Attitude Era Vol. 2 3-disc DVD set. The new set features a collection of matches and moments from 1997-2000 featuring Stone Cold Steve Austin, The Rock, De-Generation-X and more.

This new collection is a great companion to the original Attitude Era collection put out in 2012. The first collection gave you great, yet obvious vignettes, stories, and bouts that you probably have seen dozens of times or already own on several DVDs. What makes this collection so good is that it features a lot of great memories you probably either have forgotten or may have missed altogether, including some real gems.

The collection is a reminder of how much fun, yet goofy that era was. Chris Jericho recently criticized the era saying that there were a lot of stupid angles that people seem to dismiss. He’s right but what made the era so special were the matches, most specifically the atmosphere. Every crowd was hot which brought an exciting dynamic to almost every match from the era. It really gives you an appreciation for how hot the fans were during that time period.

I won’t run through the entire three discs but I do want to single out a few highlights in the set. Of course Stone Cold Steve Austin is a highlight alone. Seeing Austin at the height of his popularity in and out of the ring is a real reminder to how much fun it was to watch WWE during Austin’s era. No matter what he did, who he wrestled, or what he said, seeing Austin on television was can’t-miss TV. Austin is definitely the star of this set.

There is a lot more focus on the mid-under card in this set than the pervious. You get a lot of Val Venis, New Age Outlaws, X-Pac, Lita, etc. which isn’t a knock at all. The beauty of the era was that everyone and everything was over. The crowd adds to the excitement which make these undercard matches more exciting and intense than the majority of main-events you see in today’s WWE.

Some gems include a Lumberjack Match from RAW between Steve Austin and The Rock which I completely forgot about, a mixed tag-team match with Triple H and Trish Stratus vs. Rock and Lita, Rock and Lita vs. Kurt Angle and Stephanie McMahon, Eddie Guerrero vs. Dean Malenko from Heat, the very first Austin vs. McMahon match, and a fun Owen Hart vs. Shawn Michaels match from RAW. If you like The Rock you are in for a treat as you get a lot of rare matches from the Great One in the collection.

Overall it’s a great set and the time went by fast from DVD to DVD. For us that lived through this era, there are moments you will be reminded of that bring smiles back to your faces. For those of you who are new to the era, you will be blown away by how different the WWE was fifteen years ago and how much more exciting RAW was in 1999 and 2000 than it is in 2014. It’s not a knock on the company, just a reality and a sign of the times. I’d highly recommend the set. Make sure you put a few hours aside when you get it because once you start watching it you aren’t going to want to stop.

DISC 1

Bare Essentials

Miss Slammy Swimsuit Competition
Sunny vs. Sable vs. Marlena vs. The Funkettes
Slammy Awards * March 16, 1997

Owen Hart vs. Shawn Michaels
RAW * December 29, 1997

Bad Ass Dad

New Age Outlaws vs. Cactus Jack & Chainsaw Charlie
RAW * January 26, 1998

Intercontinental Championship Match
The Rock vs. Ken Shamrock
Royal Rumble * January 18, 1998

Stone Cold Steve Austin vs. Mr. McMahon
RAW * April 13, 1998

Leather & Chains

Owen Hart & Legion of Doom vs. Triple H & New Age Outlaws
RAW * April 20, 1998

D-Generation X Takes New York
RAW * June 8, 1998

Falls Count Anywhere #1 Contenders Match for the WWE Championship
Mankind vs. “Kane”
RAW * July 6, 1998

Letting the Dogs Out

Bikini Contest
Sable vs. Jacqueline
Fully Loaded * July 26, 1998

Val Venis & Taka Michinoku vs. KaiEnTai
RAW * August 3, 1998

WWE Championship Match
Stone Cold Steve Austin vs. Ken Shamrock
RAW * September 14, 1998

Boot Camp Match for Al Snow’s Contract
Al Snow vs. Sgt. Slaughter
RAW * September 21, 1998

Six-Man Elimination #1 Contenders Match for the European Championship
Edge vs. Gangrel vs. D’Lo Brown vs. Jeff Jarrett vs. Droz vs. Marc Mero
RAW * September 28, 1998

Extreme Name Change

WWE Championship Match
The Rock vs. X-Pac
RAW * November 23, 1998

DISC 2

Becoming a Pimp

Godfather & Val Venis vs. Mark Henry & DLo Brown
Rock Bottom * December 13, 1998

Triple H vs. Edge
RAW * January 11, 1999

Bloodbath

Kane’s Career on the Line
Stone Cold Steve Austin vs. Kane
RAW * March 1, 1999

Hardcore Championship Match
Hardcore Holly vs. Bad Ass Billy Gunn
RAW * March 15, 1999

Wild and Crazy Guys

Handicap Match
The Big Show vs. Triple H & The Rock
RAW * April 5, 1999

Pimpin’ Ain’t Country

Intercontinental Championship Match
Goldust vs. Godfather
RAW * April 12, 1999

The Hardy Boyz vs. Edge & Christian
Shotgun Saturday Night * April 17, 1999

Casket Match
The Rock vs. Undertaker
RAW * May 17, 1999

Intercontinental Championship Match
Jeff Jarrett vs. Test
Sunday Night Heat * June 13, 1999

DISC 3

Drinking with the APA

Tag Team Championship Match
Acolytes vs. Kane & X-Pac
RAW * August 9, 1999

Sexual Chocolate

Mark Henry Sex Therapy Sessions

Valentine’s Day Delight

Mark Henry and Mae Young Get a Room
RAW * February 14, 2000

Triple Threat Match for the European Championship
Kurt Angle vs. Chris Jericho vs. Tazz
RAW * March 13, 2000

Behind Breaking the Walls

Intercontinental Championship Match
Chris Jericho vs. Kurt Angle
RAW * May 8, 2000

Eddie Guerrero vs. Dean Malenko
Sunday Night Heat * June 18, 2000

Intergender Tag Team Match
The Rock & Lita vs. Kurt Angle & Stephanie McMahon-Helmsley
SmackDown * August 24, 2000

Triple Threat Match for the Women’s Championship
Lita vs. Ivory vs. Jacqueline
Sunday Night Heat * September 17, 2000

Weak Stomach

Hardcore Championship Match
Gerald Brisco vs. Crash Holly
RAW * June 5, 2000

Evening Gown Match for the Hardcore Championship
Gerald Brisco vs. Pat Patterson
King of the Ring * June 25, 2000

Wanna Ride?

Intergender Tag Team Match
The Rock & Lita vs. Triple H & Trish Stratus
RAW * July 31, 2000

BLU-RAY EXCLUSIVES

The Undertaker Attends His Parents Funeral
RAW * April 20, 1998

#1 Contenders Match for the Tag Team Championship
Kane & Mankind vs. Owen Hart & The Rock
Sunday Night Heat * August 2, 1998

Golga vs. Marc Mero
RAW * August 3, 1998

Hardcore Championship Match
Al Snow vs. Road Dogg
RAW * January 4, 1999

Lumberjack Match
Stone Cold Steve Austin vs. The Rock
RAW * May 3, 1999

Gangrel & Christian vs. Droz & Prince Albert
Sunday Night Heat * May 16, 1999

WWE Championship Match
Triple H vs. Mr. McMahon
SmackDown * September 16, 1999

Mark Henry and Mae Young Double Date
RAW * December 27, 1999

The APA Opens Their Doors
RAW * January 31, 2000

Last Man Standing Match
Triple H vs. Chris Jericho
Fully Loaded * July 23, 2000

The Attitude Era: Volume 2

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Happy 17th Anniversary WWE Montreal Screwjob

November 09, 2014 By: Category: Videos, WWE | Pro Wrestling

Seventeen years ago today history was made and an entire pro wrestling industry changed forever. Shawn Michaels defeated Bret Hart at WWE Survivor Series 1997 in the most controversial finish of our generation in what is now known as the Montreal Screwjob.

Some people thought that Vince McMahon and the WWE were finished after seeing the way Bret Hart was screwed live on pay per view. Yet ironically a finish as simple as a sharpshooter submission was the catalyst for arguably the biggest boom in WWE and pro wrestling history.

Screwjob finishes weren’t so rare in the early days of pro wrestling. Pro wrestling champions were often picked on their ability to shoot in the ring or handle themselves in these kinds of predicaments. It wasn’t out of character for a territory promoter to go rogue and have their local wrestler attempt to beat the champion and go against the script. What made this one so legendary were the people involved, the soap opera leading up to the match, and the fact that millions of people have been able to watch it.

The issues between Bret Hart and Shawn Michaels were legendary in and out of the ring at the time. I worked for ECW as a ring announcer at the time and it was pretty common to hear some of the boys who had worked for the WWE (or WWF) talk about Bret vs. Shawn and choose sides. More often than not it was Bret Hart who had the support of his fellow wrestling brothers and sisters. Yet nobody had any idea that the biggest villain in this entire mess was the puppet master himself.

Bret Hart and Shawn Michaels have both talked about their issues publicly for years. The best perspective came in 2011 when both sat down together for a WWE Home Video to talk about what had happened, what led up to it, and why it happened. Both more or less agreed that while the original intent of planting the rumors of outside of the ring heat was to stir up an angle for a WrestleMania rematch, it was their own inability to separate fact from fiction that let this one spiral out of control.

The documentary Wrestling with Shadows gave fans an incredible perspective from Bret Hart’s side after the Survivor Series. The documentary chronicled the weeks leading up to Survivor Series 1997 and the fallout after the match. In a nutshell the documentary portrayed Bret as conflicted over signing a multi-million dollar deal with WCW and the tensions he had with Vince McMahon leading up to his big match.

Of course Shawn and Bret have since written books going into great detail about the legendary night but it was Dave Meltzer in a series of Wrestling Observer newsletters that gave more detail than anyone into the background leading up to Survivor Series. What happened more or less was Vince McMahon making the ultimate pro wrestling promoter mistake by allowing his world champion to sign a contract with a rival promotion while at the same time giving his world champion creative control of how he was booked. It was arguably the biggest mistake in Vince’s tenure as WWF promoter.

Business was not good for the WWE that year and Vince had to make a decision. Vince had given Bret a 20-year contract a year earlier that would roll into Bret working behind the scenes after he retired with the WWE. Vince wanted out of the deal and allowed Bret as champion to see if he could still get a deal with WCW (Bret negotiated with both in 1996 and chose the WWE over the WCW deal). The landscape was different, WCW revenue was up, and Bret landed a deal that Vince couldn’t match. Bret gave notice and this is where everything fell apart.

Vince wanted Bret to drop the title to Shawn at Survivor Series 1997. Bret used his creative control and refused. Bret has since said that the only reason he said “no” was because Shawn told him that he wouldn’t put him over. Bret offered several alternatives including dropping the title to Ken Shamrock in the United States. Vince insisted on Shawn which Bret refused. Bret also was stern on not dropping the title in Canada. The resolution was that everyone agreed on a DQ finish in Montreal and that Bret would relinquish the WWE title to Vince McMahon on RAW the next day, which included Bret giving some kind of a shoot interview on RAW explaining his heel actions and praising Vince.

Vince was still on the fence, influenced most notably by the night Alundra Blaze showed up on WCW Nitro and dropped the WWE women’s title in a trash can. Eric Bischoff has said numerous times that he would never had done that with Bret, specifically citing legal issues between WWE and WCW. Bret has also said numerous times that he never would have allowed it. Yet it was a phone conversation between Vince, Shawn, and Triple H that changed Vince’s mind on the DQ finish. Triple H has taken credit in as being the one to speak up and protest the idea of Bret leaving as WWE champion. The plan was apparently put in place to set Bret up in a Sharpshooter, ring the bell, and change the championship on Vince’s terms. This is how Meltzer described the planned finish in the November 17, 1997 edition of the Wrestling Observer.

As they were putting their spots together, Patterson came in. He had a suggestion for a high spot in the match as a false finish. There would be a referee bump. Michaels would put Hart in his own sharpshooter. Hart would reverse the hold. Hebner would still be down at this point and not see Michaels tap out. Hart would release the hold to revive Hebner. Michaels would hit him when he turned around with the sweet chin music. A second ref, Mike Ciota, would haul ass to the ring and begin the count. A few paces behind, Owen Hart and Smith, and possibly Neidhart as well, would run down to the ring. Ciota would count 1-2, and whomever got to the ring first, likely Owen, would drag Ciota out of the ring. While they think they’ve saved the day on the pin on Bret, suddenly Hebner would recover, 1-2, and Bret would kick out. That would set the pace for about five more minutes of near falls before it would end up in a disqualification ending. Before the show started, both Vader, with his Japanese experience, and Smith, told Hart to watch himself. He was warned not to lay down and not to allow himself to be put in a compromising position. He was told to kick out at one, not two, and not to allow himself into any submission holds. Hart recognized the possibility of the situation, but his thoughts regarding a double-cross were more along with lines of always protecting himself in case Michaels tried to hit him with a sucker punch when he left himself open. The idea that being put in a submission or one of the near falls while working spots would be dangerous for him would be something to worry about normally, but he put it out of his mind because he had Hebner in the ring as the referee.

We all know what happened from there. The November 9 match was fascinating to watch as the problems between Bret and Shawn outside of the ring were legendary. Would Bret hit Shawn? How would they work together? Surprisingly to some, they worked together like pros. It was more of a brawl early on than a match but it worked. The memorable finish came when Bret climbed to the top rope to come down on Shawn, but Michaels pulled Earl Hebner in the way who took Bret’s double sledge. Michaels looked at McMahon who was at ringside and put Bret in the sharpshooter as planned. In the famous final seconds Mike Ciota ran in as Hebner was down, Hebner got up, Shawn locked in the hold, gave Bret his leg for the reverse, and Hebner quickly looked at the timekeeper and screamed “ring the bell!” Vince elbowed the timekeeper and screamed “ring the f***king bell!” The bell rang and it was all over.

The aftermath is as legendary as the sharpshooter itself. Bret spit directly at Vince McMahon in the face. Bret then went on the warpath and destroyed WWE monitors. Bret finger painted “WCW” in the air to all four corners of the ring. In the dressing room he confronted Michaels who pleaded ignorance, obviously lying to his face. According to several reports it was The Undertaker who demanded that Vince McMahon that he needed to apologize to Bret. Now in the Wrestling with Shadows Vince is shown entering Bret’s dressing room but the cameras were not allowed in. This is reportedly where Bret told Vince to leave or he was going to punch him, in addition to calling him a liar. Reportedly Bret finished getting dressed and a scuffle broke out which saw Bret drop Vince with a punch to the jaw. Shane McMahon reportedly jumped on Bret’s back at which point Davey Boy Smith pulled Shane off and hyperextended his knee in the process. Bret reportedly asked Vince if he was going to screw him on money at which point Vince said no. The documentary cameras then caught Vince groggily walking out of the dressing room.

Now there have been skeptics in the business that have for years doubted that this was indeed a screwjob at all. I have talked to at least a handful of wrestlers that have sworn the whole thing was a big work between everyone. The only piece of evidence that always had me doubting the validity of all of this was the punch. The documentary cameras caught everything but the punch, which to me is the most pivotal moment in the story. I always doubted whether this punch really took place because if it didn’t, this whole thing was a sham. Fifteen years later these guys have all done a great job of convincing me that this was all real but I have always been skeptical of why everything was on tape but the punch.

To show my ignorance at the time, I presumed that Vince McMahon was done at this point. “Who could ever trust that guy again?” I remember having a telephone conversation with Chris Jericho a few days after the incident. Jericho was on the verge of becoming a free agent in a little over a year. I asked that same question to Chris who explained to me that it would become irrelevant when it comes to guys negotiating deals. Now this was at a time where it was rumored that Chris already had some kind of working deal in place with the WWE down the line. Coming from a guy who was a close friend of the Hart family really opened up my eyes at the big picture.

The fallout from this was ironically great for everyone involved. The WWE didn’t run away from this story, they embraced it. The story became the catalyst for the Vince McMahon heel character which some would say was the greatest drawing heel in pro wrestling history. That heel character became the villain in the biggest feud in WWE history between Steve Austin and Vince McMahon. The story turned business around and would eventually put WCW out of business and launch the Attitude Era into full motion.

Bret wound up going to WCW and earning millions of dollars over the next couple of years. Bret also participated in a spinoff angle at Starrcade 1997 involving Hulk Hogan and Sting. Bret’s career in WCW was never what it was in the WWE but at his age, but it was the money that was the biggest coup. Unfortunately Bret suffered several tragedies outside of the ring which have been thoroughly documented. I always thought that Bret would return to the WWE when his WCW deal was up, wrestle Shawn Michaels, and draw the biggest WrestleMania buyrate in history. It was never to be.

Shawn Michaels had a great career and was never impacted at all by that infamous night. In fact, Shawn returned to the ring after a lengthy layoff and became one of the most popular WWE stars during his final run. New fans had no idea about the Montreal Screwjob or seemed to care about the villainous act Shawn Michaels portrayed in 1997. Even brief references to that night weren’t enough to damage the enormous fan support Shawn gained over the years.

Bret Hart eventually returned to the WWE as a performer in 2010. Bret returned earlier to be inducted into the WWE Hall of Fame but it was a one-night appearance. Bret signed on to return at the start of a TNA-WWE Monday Night War which lasted only a matter of weeks. Bret made peace with Shawn on his first night back but would eventually wrestle Vince McMahon at WrestleMania. For a number of reasons, the match never lived up to the hype. A goofy car accident angle leading up to the match certainly didn’t help. Bret wrestled a few more matches and actually won the U.S. title. Bret continues to pop up from time to time and is in the process of working with the WWE on launching a new DVD.

Who was right and who was wrong? It is really tough to say. For me, I always thought that Vince McMahon as the promoter had the right to do what he thought he needed to do for business. His biggest mistake was allowing a guy with creative control to win his WWE title and freely negotiate as champion. Many have come out and criticized Bret Hart as taking his role as a pro wrestling champion too seriously, citing that wrestling is a work anyway. I have always felt that Bret bordered on just being overall obnoxious about this over the years and failed to take responsibility for his part in it. Bret’s father was a promoter and should have understood more than anyone that Vince had the right to do what he felt he needed to do with his championship. At the same time he was savvy enough to negotiate creative control so it was in his right to exercise it.

Regardless of who was right and who was wrong, everyone came away as winners after the Survivor Series. At the end of the day pro wrestling is a business and if the idea of business is to make the most money, than everyone involved capitalized on the controversy. Many have tried to script finishes to play off of the Survivor Series but the authenticity of that infamous night in Montreal is virtually impossible to duplicate which is why that we probably won’t see a finish as legendary as this in our lifetime.

Happy 17th anniversary Montreal Screwjob. You changed the business forever!

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Vince McMahon’s WWE Return Could Lead To WrestleMania Angle

November 06, 2014 By: Category: WWE | Pro Wrestling

Vince McMahon returned to WWE television for the first time in months and it was a welcomed surprise. While it appeared that McMahon came back to set up the Survivor Series main-event, many are speculating that this was all the start of a long road to WrestleMania 31.

McMahon came back seemingly out of the blue on Monday Night RAW as part of the angle to set up the Authority’s team vs. Team Cena at Survivor Series. Vinnie Mac didn’t stick around long as he left after a vignette with Stephanie and Triple H. Stephanie and Triple H were excited to see him go and the dynamic is leading some to think that there are much bigger plans here than a Survivor Series headliner.

The timing is what has people talking. At the very same time last year, Vince was booked to return to television. He was advertised as appearing on the television events and yet never appeared. Vince was set to take center stage in a huge WrestleMania 30 angle. The angle would have played out with Triple H and Stephanie fighting Vince for control of the company (an original angle of course). The story would have peaked at WrestleMania with a match between Triple H and either Stone Cold Steve Austin or The Rock. For whatever reason, the angle was scrapped and McMahon never made those appearances. Are we about to see this angle delayed?

One thing is for sure. If we are seeing the angle, we aren’t going to see it peak with a match between Austin and Hunter at Mania. Austin has made it clear that while he is open to the idea of coming back for one more match, it won’t be in California. Austin said recently on his podcast that his schedule would prohibit him to train properly for a return this spring. Enter The Rock!

Was it coincidence, a cute vignette, or the start of something big when The Rock and Triple H issued WrestleMania challenges back and forth on SmackDown 15? My takeaway from that skit was that the two were laying the groundwork for a match at WrestleMania 32. They clearly made it a point to mention stadium and attendance and that seemed more in line with the goals of 32 than 31. At the same time, many others observed that they were setting up a match at 31. It looks like I may be wrong…again.

As for the angle, it sounds like I am reading a booking sheet for a RAW in 2002. I am sorry, this whole heel authority angle has been so played out that none of these stories get me excited anymore. Logically, it makes zero sense in the WWE from a continuity standpoint since you had the board remove Vince and Hunter a couple of years back for bad behavior, but that was a different lifecycle. Also, I find it hard pressed that fans are really going to be sympathetic to Vince McMahon in his fight for his company.

I also can’t think of a bigger waste of money than booking The Rock against Triple H. I am not opposed to seeing that match again but when you have such limited dates on The Rock, I’d think you can make better use of his drawing power against a newcomer like Rusev or a big-match situation like Brock Lesnar. Seeing The Rock fight for Vince McMahon against Triple H is probably the last idea I’d have on my list of booking plans for Dwayne Johnson.

Unfortunately it looks like this angle is coming and there is nothing we can do about it. The positive is that we will probably get a lot of fun Rock interviews come this spring. The downside is that we will be bored to death with a McMahon vs. Authority feud before we get there.

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Randy Orton’s True Value in the WWE

November 06, 2014 By: Category: WWE | Pro Wrestling

Thank you, WWE. Finally a Monday night of RAW where it appeared everything fell into place. It started with Vince McMahon and ended with a bloodied Randy Orton. I’m not sure whether the Chairman of the Board had something to do with the even flow of the program or the fact that John Cena was not front and center for the night, but from the beginning, the company threw out consistent jabs only to finish the final segment with a flurry that makes me want to watch Survivor Series now rather than later.

Here are some thoughts from Monday night.

Although it appears he is going to be MIA for a while because of his upcoming movie, The Condemned 2, which begins filming on Nov. 11, it also appears Orton may have suffered a concussion from Seth Rollins’s curb stomp on the steel step after their match in the main event. That would explain Orton’s absence from the company (a la Dean Ambrose) and the return in time for Survivor Series where he joins John Cena et al in the traditional Survivor Series match.

When I see Orton, he reminds me of a younger Barry Windham—one who has so much talent that he may not realize how great he really is.

Windham and Orton did not cross paths in their careers. Windham did cross paths with his father in the NWA three decades ago.

Yes, Orton is that special—regardless of injuries, regardless of his attitude early on in his career.

Regardless of suspensions and repackaging his character over and over, Orton delivers. There are few—Kane, John Cena, CM Punk, Undertaker, Chris Jericho and others—who night-in and night-out give us exactly what we want to see. It is the only way he knows how to do it.

Even after he has been at war 12 years in the WWE, there is something still mysterious about “The Viper”—the fact that at any moment he could change personalities, jump from face to heel or surprise us all and win another world title.

That is Orton’s true value to this company. Versatility is key when you are essentially stuck in limbo, while other WWE superstars are passing you by.

He is a 12-time world champion, holding the WWE Championship eight times and the World Heavyweight Championship four times, and was the final holder of the World Heavyweight Championship before it was unified with the WWE Championship to create the WWE World Heavyweight Championship.

Orton is a third-generation professional wrestler; his grandfather Bob Orton, Sr., his father “Cowboy” Bob Orton, and his uncle Barry Orton all competed in the professional wrestling business. Before being promoted to the main World Wrestling Federation (WWF, now WWE) roster, Orton trained in and wrestled for Mid-Missouri Wrestling Association-Southern Illinois Conference Wrestling for a month. He was then sent to Ohio Valley Wrestling (OVW), where he held the OVW Hardcore Championship twice.

After signing with WWF, Orton became a member of the stable Evolution, which quickly led to a WWE Intercontinental Championship reign, his first title with the company.

He also acquired the moniker “The Legend Killer” during a storyline where he began disrespecting physically attacking WWE Hall of Famers and wrestling veterans. At age 24, he became the youngest person ever to hold the World Heavyweight Championship.

Shortly after winning his first word title, he was dropped from Evolution, which was created by Triple H and was formed with Ric Flair, Batista and Orton in mind.

This is now the second time in his career that Orton has been eliminated from a faction where Triple H was the front man. That may be just the final straw that brings The Viper back from the dark side.

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