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Archive for the ‘WWE | Pro Wrestling’

CM Punk Speaks On WWE Departure, Will Never Return

November 27, 2014 By: Category: WWE | Pro Wrestling

You knew he wasn’t going to keep his mouth shut forever. CM Punk has finally broken his silence and speaking up about what led him to quitting the WWE. I think it’s safe to say you can cross Punk back in WWE off of your wish list for 2015.

Ten months after walking out of the WWE 30 minutes before a RAW broadcast, Punk has given his first wrestling interview where he opened up and told his side of the story regarding his WWE exile. Punk gave the exclusive to his old buddy Colt Cabana on the Art of Wrestling podcast and what an exclusive it was.

Punk said the reason he quit was all due to his deteriorating health. He told Cabana that he had been wrestling with broken ribs, bad knees, and suffered a concussion at the Rumble. It had been widely reported that Punk was badly beat up around that time but I don’t think anyone realized how badly he was hurting. Punk said that he had a fever and no appetite for months. Punk also took a shot at the company and made a dig about his paychecks shrinking.

I think the most damning thing Punk said about the company was in regards to his concussion. Punk said he suffered the concussion in the Rumble. Punk said he finished the Rumble with the injury. Punk said that he passed the WWE concussion test the next day, which had also been reported. Punk then said what I think could be the most damaging thing of the entire interview in that he questioned the credibility of the WWE concussion test. He called it “bullsh*t.” Punk also noted that the company showed no concern over his concussion and were more worried about him obtaining Visas and taking a drug test for upcoming tours.

That is big. Keep in mind that this allegation comes just several weeks after the company evaded a potential public relations fallout from the Alberto Del Rio firing. The WWE proudly take credit for their head-injury and concussion program. Punk is the first major star to come out and question the authenticity of the program. It will be very interesting to see if any of the media or any of the WWE’s partners follow up on this. Maybe not, but there is potential some real fallout here.

Punk went into detail about his last hour or so in the WWE. Punk said he told Vince McMahon and Triple H he was going home. Punk then told Cabana that he told off Triple H for stifling his momentum in 2011. He also said that he complained to Vince for killing his creativity. He said he told them both that it was garbage that Daniel Bryan wasn’t in the WrestleMania 30 main-event.

Punk said that he was actually fired from the WWE and he never quit. Punk said Vince was in tears when he left and hugged him goodbye. Punk said he never heard a word from him and then a few weeks later Vince text him and told him he was suspended. He then said he was delivered termination papers for a breach of contract on his wedding day. He said that the WWE were afraid he was going to go to TNA. He said that eventually both sides settled on a settlement that gave him more than what he wanted. He also said that he despises wrestling and would never go back. He said that he refused the WWE’s request to issue a joint statement on their settlement.

This certainly gives a different spin to the story that was coming out of the WWE side the last several months. According to the WWE side, Punk was upset about his place on WrestleMania, didn’t want to work with Triple H and so he quit. Nothing has ever been said about his health other than he passed a concussion test the night he quit. Hearing Punk’s side of the story certainly gives me a different take on the whole situation.

One thing I will say is that Punk recently blasted his fans on Twitter asking him to come back. He compared himself to Barry Sanders and said something along the lines of fans don’t care about his health. Let’s call a spade a spade here. Punk probably treats his fans worse than any other WWE superstar on the roster. There are all kinds of reports of Punk being rude to his fans. Punk himself even told fans to stay away from him in a Comic Con Q&A whereas you have a guy like Randy Orton who said on TMZ that he wants fans to know he is approachable. To each their own but he clearly separated CM Punk and Phil Brooks from his fans and when he is outside of the ring he doesn’t want to be bothered, so why should they care about Phil Brooks?

At the end of the day I think it is clear that no matter what anyone wants to think, Punk is not coming back now, next year, or ever. I think it is time for WWE crowds to stop the chants and appreciate the years you had with him. Maybe he changes his mind in a few years but it would appear at this point in time that CM Punk is officially retired and retired for good.

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Professional Wrestling: Being Thankful for the Business and Holiday

November 27, 2014 By: Category: WWE | Pro Wrestling

If the WWE stays in character, right about now Vince McMahon is stewing over the idea of staring across the dinner table at both Triple H and Stephanie McMahon after the debacle of Survivor Series.

Oh, to be a fly on the McMahon wall as the turkey and dressing is passed around the family.

As a fan, the holidays have always been a special time for me and my family, centering on sports and professional wrestling. I have told this story before but it bears worth sharing again.

When we were living in Atlanta in the early 1980s and Vince McMahon was just starting to change the culture of a steady “sport” into a business of “sports entertainment” my brother Rob and I had this deal with my parents. If we did our chores, had out homework done for the weekend and were clean from head to toe, we could go to our room (with our new television we got for our birthday) and watch wrestling. There was a channel in Atlanta that catered to professional wrestling on Saturday nights. From 8 pm until midnight, we watched Mid-Atlantic Championship Wrestling, WCCW, AWA and UWF. It was my wrestling heaven and for my parents, it was like having a night out with the house to themselves.

I wish professional wrestling was like that now – a slow moving train of top stars and some that were just making their way in the wrestling world – Magnum TA, The Blade Runners (Sting, Warrior), Steve Williams and Ted DiBiase and some guy named Arn Anderson. Today, the retread on the careers of most wrestlers makes them 90 years old in cat years. Back then, promotions, territories and the belief in Kayfabe were the lay of the land and the “Dusty Finish” was one of the most recognizable elements in the business.

So, in the spirit of the holiday and the “sport” of professional wrestling, here are a few things I am thankful for…

THE BELIEF IN DOLPH ZIGGLER

After last week’s show in the Survivor Series match, has the WWE finally come to its senses and decided to make him the “go to” guy of the company, giving John Cena a break for a bit? There was a bit of Shawn Michaels in him last Sunday night. It was a great performance.

ERICK ROWAN AND LUKE HARPER

While they are no longer members of the Wyatt Family, they have bright futures as opponents. I like what the company has done to change things up a bit. I am also excited to see if Rowan and Big Show feud for a bit.

THE CONTINUED MAGIC OF CHRIS JERICHO

No longer is a main event star, Jericho good for the WWE in that he helps put blossoming talent over and will work well as a commentator when he gets a chance. Remember, RAW is JERICHO.

TRIPLE H

The comments he made about the past and how he has withstood the test of time while other veterans have returned into the sunset of the wrestling business. Triple H and Daniel Bryan together were a major highlight of WrestleMania XXX. If need be, the COO of the company could still sell it in the ring.

DEAN AMBROSE AND SETH ROLLINS

These two wrestlers are the future of the company. Add Roman Reigns and these three former members of The Shield will be mainstays of the WWE. When all three are back in action after Reigns returns from injury, everyone look out.

The WWE NETWORK

It may be hokey to pay $9.99 to watch professional wrestling, but when you look at the catalog, it makes perfect sense. When I can watch wrestling matches of the past and from my childhood, it makes me happy.

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10 WCW Imports in WWE That Fizzled

November 26, 2014 By: Category: lists, WWE | Pro Wrestling

Sting’s debut at WWE Survivor Series has understandably created a ton of buzz. It’s the icon’s WWE debut after over 25 years of being a big name away from the Stamford giant. Once ‘the one that got away’, Sting’s save of Dolph Ziggler, and attack of Triple H, capped off one hell of a main event. It was the perfect introduction to the WWE world.

But what happens next? Numerous other WCW icons tripped up in WWE, either having a benign tenure or petering out after a promising start. WWE hasn’t always been kind to the Atlanta legends, and here are ten examples of something getting lost in translation.

10. Barry Windham (1989)

You could argue that Windham had everything a wrestler needed: the look of a taller Jax Teller, the subtle mean-streak a heel needs, the sympathetic eyes a babyface needs, and ability to wrestle lengthy, credible matches, whether they were scientific or a wild brawl. His sixty-minute battles with Ric Flair remain legendary. WWE scooped up Windham in June 1989, shortly after he departed NWA.

Windham’s four month tenure was mostly uneventful, save for the gain of a new nickname (“The Widowmaker”), and a collection of wins over preliminary bums. Windham would depart suddenly in the fall, and was replaced at the Survivor Series by a debuting Earthquake. Windham unfortunately had barely made a dent in 1989, the prime of his career, although good days back in WCW were ahead.

9. Dusty Rhodes (1989)

Rhodes was already 43 years old when the former Crockett-era main eventer and booker was brought into the WWE fold, after being fired shortly into Ted Turner’s ownership. The signing seemed to make sense for WWE; without booking power (read: the capacity to put himself over at the expense of others), Rhodes would play ball, and still probably make an impact with the young WWE crowd.

Truth is, Rhodes did remain a crowd favorite for Vince McMahon, but with a caveat: he entertained in polka dots (or in Dusty’s lisp, ‘doth’). While Rhodes could still engage crowds with his exuberance and cult-like connectability, in spite of increasing age and girth alike, “The Dream” was ‘humbled’ as some dot-wearing fool who never sniffed the main event before vanishing in early 1991.

8. Diamond Dallas Page (2001)

Page is more lauded today for his life-altering yoga program than he is for his remarkable wrestling career. That’s kind of a shame; Page whipped himself into shape as a world-class performer by 1997, already in his forties, through hard-work and meticulous pre-match planning. That was in WCW. In WWE, Page sadly stumbled out of the gate, thanks to a particularly stupid idea.

Despite being married to Kimberly Page, the former Nitro Girl with the taut figure and virtuous smile, Page entered WWE under the guise of a creepy stalker, filming Undertaker’s then-wife Sara in vulnerable moments. Though Page would explain after his reveal that he did so to rile up Undertaker, nobody bought DDP as some perverted voyeur. Undertaker basically mauled him into midcard oblivion.

7. Scott Steiner (2002)

Although the Steiner Brothers 1992-94 tenure with WWE limped to a finish, you can’t really argue with the content. Like Arn Anderson and Tully Blanchard’s year with McMahon, the Steiners were used in a championship capacity, and were given plenty of time to stand out. Things went south, reportedly after the Steiners wanted to work in Japan and McMahon balked at sharing his stars.

By 2002, Scott Steiner had changed. The mullet was gone and impossible muscles were the calling card. With his misogynistic speeches, “The Big Bad Booty Daddy” oozed personality. Upon his 2002 return, the hype was immense, but the fuse was snuffed quick. A pair of disastrous matches with Triple H (notably at the 2003 Royal Rumble) exposed Steiner as easily winded and virtually broken down.

6. Lex Luger (1993)

Forgetting for a moment that Luger was brought in to compete in the WBF just five weeks after losing the WCW Title to Sting, we’ll say Luger’s real debut for McMahon was in 1993. Generally, Luger was only as big as the people he worked with, but an impressive physique and arrogant smirk made him a capable villain. Bret Hart, Mr. Perfect, and Randy Savage were to make natural foils.

Luger would limp through two gimmicks that were, decidedly, not “Total Package”-like. The first, “The Narcissist” was more based in mythology than up Luger’s Gold’s Gym-dwelling alley. With Hulk Hogan fading away, Luger was colored in with red, white, and blue as an All-American hero, a spectacular flop given Luger’s lack of conviction when preaching blue-collar American ideals.

5. Vader (1996)

A loss through Paul Orndorff’s right-cross was McMahon’s gain. After littering his roster with repackaged oldies and haven’t-beens in 1995, WWE needed someone with credibility they could shove up the card (especially since Luger had enough and departed in September). Vader’s WCW exodus led to McMahon signing the Rocky Mountain monster, and set to debut the angry beast at the Royal Rumble.

To McMahon’s credit, Vader’s persona wasn’t tinkered with; he was still the red-mask wearing bully that cut opponents like sugar cane with his unpulled punches. The problem was that Vader receded into the midcard after a lukewarm feud with champion Shawn Michaels and was rarely seen as a threat after that. By 1998, Vader was putting over a young Edge, Kane, and JBL before his exit.

4. Ric Flair (1991)

This one is sure to draw some negative words. Yes, Flair was made to be a big deal when he jumped with the WCW Title in the summer of 1991. Yes, Flair immediately feuded with icons like Roddy Piper and Hulk Hogan. Yes, Flair won the 1992 Royal Rumble, the best match in the event’s annals, to become WWE Champion following an awe-inspiring, unparalleled one-hour performance.

After that? Flair didn’t feel like Flair. Sure, he tormented Randy Savage with promises to show lurid photos of Miss Elizabeth, but once he lost the belt, the magic was gone. Flair became ordinary, unbefitting of his grandeur. Slowly, Flair seemed like he was being phased out, his main event appearances diminishing. And he never did have that mega-showdown with Hogan on PPV.

3. The New World Order (2002)

WWE had parroted for several years the idea that wrestling had become a young man’s game, and those decrepit fools on the other channel aren’t worthy of your time. In hindsight, that’s laughable, given how many 40-50 year olds get main event paydays in WWE these days, but the youth movement was worth pushing. And push it they did until when one promotion remained, and free agents loomed.

With WWE’s ratings stagnating, McMahon brough back Hulk Hogan, Kevin Nash, and Scott Hall to reform the nWo’s holy trinity. Once ground-breaking, all three were blown off by The Rock in 30 seconds at No Way Out. The cool factor was gone, and the threat of a hostile takeover was merely just three guys doing the same run-in that anybody else would do. This nWo died in five months.

2. Goldberg (2003)

Should have been a slam-dunk. Two hours after Eric Bischoff had a physically-distressed Steve Austin removed from the building, Goldberg arrived to fill in as the new hero. Right away, Goldberg speared The Rock, and a new battle of the icons was set for Backlash. Goldberg won, but not before taking part in an irksome backstage bit where Goldust had “The Man” wear his blonde wig.

There lies the problem with Goldberg, V2: he was humanized. The Goldberg in WCW kept his head down and his mouth shut before dispatching victims with cold-blooded brutality. People wanted *that* Goldberg, not a talkative gentleman who stays placid and gregarious until provoked. If WWE writers remade Friday the 13th, Jason Voorhees would be given 15 minute soliloquies. No one wants that.

1. The Invasion (2001)

More accurately, the Invasion flopped because of who was excluded, not so much the actual participants. When Shane McMahon bought WCW in the story, the battle lines were drawn between he and his father, the man who did as much to destroy WCW as WCW had done to itself. Fans conjured up dream matches in their heads, the ultimate in fantasy warfare closing in like a category five storm.

All of the names above that would have been reasonable entrants, sans DDP, were absent. No Hogan, no Hall, no Nash, no Goldberg, no Flair, no Steiner. Oh, and no Sting, of course. Booker T and midcarders such as Shane Helms, Lance Storm, and Chuck Palumbo provided no match for WWE while the big names sat home on big-money Time Warner deals. Among other reasons, the Invasion flopped hard.

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Sting’s True Impact on WWE and 2015

November 25, 2014 By: Category: WWE | Pro Wrestling

The wrestling world stood still at about 10:35 Sunday night as Sting finally made his way into a WWE arena and shocked the world.

Finally, the business had come full circle. After rumors had run rampant that “The Icon” would give the fans what they have been waiting decades to see, Sting walked into the ring, stared down Triple H and the Authority and changed the WWE in a matter of 10 minutes.

Watching wrestling is now must see television again. My only question about what transpired on Sunday night is, “What took so long?”

The emergence of Steve Borden and his “Sting” persona was a dramatic as Ric Flair walking on the set with the World Title in hand and the day Hulk Hogan jumped to the dark side and joined the NOW. Thank goodness the company finally saw the decline in crowd support, cable buys and the lack of success with the WWE Network to make changes in the format of its storylines. With Sting on board and the potential decline of The Authority, the WWE is walking a different path to success.

Even before the emergence of the man painted in black and white, the change already started with just one punch. Big Show’s heel turn on John Cena and the Shawn Michaels-like performance by Dolph Ziggler signaled the company’s willingness (and possibly Cena’s) to allow other superstars command the spotlight.

If Cena is on board with letting this storyline develop (which also includes what happens with Stephanie McMahon and Triple H), the “Year of Mediocrity” could be saved at the TLC pay-per-view in three weeks and lead to a huge confrontation between Triple H and Stinger.

As one fan wrote online the morning after the event in St. Louis, “There are plenty of storylines that came out of this pay-per-view. Hopefully the WWE will let them play out.”

Right now, I do not think there is any choice but to let things develop and see where they go. There is a chance the 2015 wrestling year will start with a “bang” and continue down a path of change, revolution and revelation. At some point, the Authority angle had to crumble. I do not see it as a complete elimination of the angle, but now the company must worry more about recouping money it has lost from poor business decisions. Sting is the catalyst for the turnaround.

Sorry, John Cena.

While Flair’s arrival in the WWF was not as successful as fans and management had hoped it would be for the company, Hogan’s jump to WCW was every bit the marketing boon it had hoped to be – even if the red and yellow was booed from time to time because he was not the “wrestler” Flair was. Sting has a chance to do what he does best and make the most of it – save the professional wrestling business.

In the early days of the NWA and the growth of WCW, Ric Flair was the top heel, Dusty Rhodes was the top face and slowly, the younger Stinger took over that spot from Rhodes. While the WWE does not have many young stars to build around – although Bray Wyatt, Roman Reigns, Seth Rollins and Dean Ambrose are a good start, it is time to get away from John Cena being the company’s John Wayne. In a sense, Sting – although 55 years old – provides the perfect connection to the future of the company.

While Reigns recovers and the company decides which WWE superstar will hand over the company title to Rollins, Sting is the one character and performer who will keep the fans’ need for younger talent to thrive at bay. And with the push to make Ziggler a go-to-guy in the company, for once the future in the WWE looks brighter than it has been in years.

Even if it took the dark side of Sting to make all that happen.

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WWE Post Survivor Series 2014 Perspective

November 25, 2014 By: Category: WWE | Pro Wrestling

So the 2014 Survivor Series is history and as Joel Gertner would say, “Well, well, well…” So Sting has finally arrived in the WWE. Team Cena wins. New tag champs. And a Roman Reigns cameo. And all of this was free thanks to the November Special promo offer. I wanted to do an article within the past couple of weeks but I thought it would be best to wait until after the Survivor Series to get a better picture of which direction the WWE superstars will be going as 2015 approaches.

Of course, Sting was the big news from the Survivor Series pay-per-view. Didn’t expect to see him until early next year but why not plant the roots late in the year during the NFL season to grab some eyes away from Monday Night Football. I’m now hooked on it more so to the point that I will be clicking back a few times more than normal. It felt like Sting had been on the wrestler in history to never sign with the WWE. His appearance came to a huge pop but a little surprised he confronted HHH. What does that tell at first glance?

I’m looking at a Sting/HHH fight at WrestleMania which may quell the rumor of a Sting/Undertaker match. If that’s the case, then Undertaker hasn’t retired and will lead into Lesnar/Taker 2 for WrestleMania 31. Even though Sting is scheduled only one WWE match I could see more than one match in his future. He’s too big a star not to be used and the WWE brass would get a lot of Pay per view buys if he wrestles in the Royal Rumble and WrestleMania with an outside shot as Summerslam for his final match.

Dolph Ziggler – Kudos to him for a well-deserved night of work for this superstar. He was in the Survivor Series match through the end. I don’t know what the deal is as to why he hasn’t gotten another chance at a WWE title reign. He’s popular and more importantly he’s a hard worker in the ring. He’s come a long way from the Spirit Squad and made a name for himself. I admit I was wrong when branched out into Dolph Ziggler thinking he’s annoying and won’t gel with the fans. He’s to hoping a strong 2015 for Ziggler. On a side note, I just realized that Dolph’s never lost a Survivor Series match; impressive.

Tag-Team Scene – I love Goldust & Stardust. They brought life back into the tag-team division but hopefully The Miz/Damien Sandow tandem works out. I’ve been tired of The Miz recently ever since he lost the WWE title years ago and I feel that his star has been fading. Maybe this will add life to his career.

Dean Ambrose/Bray Wyatt – Will we ever be disappointed with this feud? The two came out with guns a blazing and with expected pop of a great match. The disqualification was a weak decision but I get it as this feud can carry over into 2015; heck even all of 2015 and we wouldn’t be disappointed.

  Cena – So Team Cena won the Survivor Series match. Where does John Cena go from here? With the RAW headlines dealing with The Authority and other side feuds the WWE has completely forgotten about the WWE Title currently held by Brock Lesnar. This needs to change ASAP because the title is losing its relevance and it’s a sad state of affairs that the Money in the Bank briefcase angle has taken the spotlight more so than the actual belt. It’s not Seth Rollins fault. He’s definitely worth the push but the higher-ups need to get their goods in order and the first thing they need to do is to get Lesnar on TV every couple of weeks. He doesn’t have to wrestle but at least keep us notified that he’s the current WWE champion. The Randy Orton/John Cena matches have been very entertaining over the past couple of months but enough already. Move onto Seth Rollins. He’s due to cash in on the briefcase and win the title; hopefully by the end of the year to garner interest into the Rumble or win at the Rumble.

The Survivor Series is history and it’s time to keep an eye on the final month of 2014 and see what to expect at the Royal Rumble. The Survivor Series has established roots for new feuds while wrapping up others. I’ll be addressing these items in future articles. Until then, Happy Thanksgiving to all! Be safe and be good.

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Dolph Ziggler Establishes Himself as Go-To Star

November 24, 2014 By: Category: WWE | Pro Wrestling

As we older wrestling fans bitterly walk into our thirties and forties, we have this tendency to slip on rose-tinted sunglasses. This is done in an attempt to view today’s wrestling world through old lens, as much of a chore it is to try and build parallels to the two.

In particular, we sometimes champion a wrestler in today’s field by dressing them in the repurposed shell of a wrestler we heralded about an era or two back. Daniel Bryan became the bearded, jovial reincarnate of Chris Benoit, one that nobody would feel guilty about enjoying. Bray Wyatt’s manner of speech invoked memories of Jake Roberts and Kevin Sullivan, the calm savage. CM Punk at one time had seanced the spirit of Stone Cold Steve Austin, through profanity, blunt honesty, and defiance. When Punk’s walkout in 2014 too eerily matched Austin’s 2002 vacancy, Dean Ambrose stepped in to be the unconventional, office-scorning rebel.

What about Dolph Ziggler? Before, Ziggler was a more convincing offspring of Curt Hennig than Curtis Axel is, flailing like a fish out of water off the simplest of offensive strikes, curly blonde locks scattering like the frills of a pom-pom. Salesmanship aside, Ziggler’s legitimate athletic background, like Hennig’s, was oh-so-perfectly melded with a willingness to portray the preening-douche-turned-punching-bag for so many. Imbued with these traits, Ziggler is indispensable.

Ziggler also shares similarities with other Hennig fashioner, Shawn Michaels. In the 1990s (hell, up until his 2010 retirement), Michaels could steal the show as either a face (drawing sympathy for the comeback, telling a story equally through emotion and athletics) or a heel (for the same qualities as Hennig and Ziggler). Michaels will forever have tenancy in wrestling’s penthouse suite for his ability to take the most jaded know-it-all, the ‘I wouldn’t have written the story THIS way’ grouch, and reduce him to a bright-eyed believer through sheer will. It’s a skill nobody can duplicate.

This isn’t to say Ziggler is scraping insulation in Michaels’ ceiling at present time, but after Survivor Series, there’s a new inkling of just how sky-high Ziggler’s ceiling may be.

It’s a role Michaels nailed eleven years ago, the hopeless hero. Michaels needed to survive against Chris Jericho, Christian, and a less-inked Randy Orton in order to save Steve Austin’s job. The fact that Michaels had lost enough blood to fill a fish-tank only upped the drama several rungs. Looking like Carrie White, Michaels lucked his way into eliminating Christian and Jericho before Orton ended the miracle run after Batista interfered. Anyone who watched that match will tell you while catching their breath that it’s typical, by-the-book HBK, while exhaling, “And it’s f–king incredible.”

Sunday night, Ziggler was in the same predicament, with some wholly moving twists.

In the match to determine whether The Authority would be vanquished or whether some upper-midcard babyfaces would be fired instead, Ziggler, once canon fodder so far wedged into the sole-grooves of WWE’s shoe, was the last hope for the good guys. This was especially shocking, given that the usual Superman, John Cena, had been disposed of through Big Show’s annual heel turn midway through the bout. Across from a weary (but not bloody, per Mattel’s humble invective) Ziggler were Seth Rollins, Kane, and Luke Harper. Alas, it’s a parallel.

Knowing that only Cena could take out the 82nd Airborne without assistance, the St. Louis crowd began looking for the run-in. Given that Randy Orton was recently spurned by the heels, and that the Gateway City is Orton’s home, the natives earnestly chanted for him while Ziggler was bounced around by the corporate ladder. Not a good sign when you’re so far down the caste, fans believe more in the savior than the worker.

Then it happened: Ziggler won over the crowd. Repeated kickouts, subtle appeals through relaying of agony and exhaustion, and the fans were pulling for Ziggler to complete the comeback. If Daniel Bryan didn’t belong in Ziggler’s generation, I’d say that Dolph usurped the underdog schtick from him.

There weren’t any YES chants, but the fans popped fierce when Ziggler downed Kane cleanly with the Zig Zag. The cheers were louder when Dolph managed to roll up Harper and rid him from the bout. JBL was angrily stunned. Michael Cole, in a rare moment of intense focus, sold Ziggler as a warrior, running on empty for the sake of his job. Ziggler and Rollins engaged in a tremendous series of near falls in the lead-up to the Sports Entertainment Finish, well-executed and welcome for all of its convolution.

‘Holy crap, it’s Sting!’ will trump ‘holy crap, Dolph pulled it off!’ when panning for website clicks, but Ziggler’s story is needed long-term. The match has absolutely made Ziggler, Sting’s deus ex machina help or not. WWE has needed organic heroes more than it’s needed accurate dates on its WWE Network content. Punk said see ya, Bryan’s out long-term, Ambrose is there if they truly want him, and Roman Reigns’ biggest feud may be the one he’s having with the teleprompter.

Ziggler was dead, an afterthought. His outspokenness had cancelled out his world-class athleticism, and if a PPV in 2013 or 2014 passed by without him, nobody blinked. His demotion was accepted; his scripted wins these days more startling than appreciated. Whoever shook their head in the office and said, ‘wait, why aren’t we doing MORE with Dolph?’ may be a one-eyed-prophet in the land of the blind, but that one eye understands the man’s value.

I’d argue that Ziggler’s survival trumps Bryan’s WrestleMania wins. We all knew that Bryan was getting those victories as an apology for a winter’s worth of short-sighted booking, and angry fans weren’t to be denied. Ziggler’s rise from fodder is more notable because in less than 20 minutes, he won over the crowd that wanted Orton, and busted his ass for each ounce of renewed appreciation.

Writing out of Hunter and Stephanie aside, this is why we all loved last night’s match. We all believed because Dolph Ziggler made us believe. Shawn Michaels chuckles knowingly.

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WWE Survivor Series: General Thoughts on a Semi-Decent Event

November 24, 2014 By: Category: WWE | Pro Wrestling

At least the ending was something to remember. STING IS HERE!

I am purposely staying away from the main event match of the night. Too much to comprehend and I want to pay the impact of Sting appearing in St. Louis its proper respect.

By the way – All Hail Dolph Ziggler.

Here are some of my thoughts on the other matches at the pay-per-view… hopefully the WWE will learn to make the WWE World Champion at a PPV at some point soon.

As if it wasn’t obvious, the fans of the WWE got a taste of the first match for the TLC pay-per-view event to close out 2014.

Frankly, it is one of the best moves the WWE could make to finalize an up and down year of professional wrestling. Ambrose and Wyatt stole the show last night, in my opinion.

Wyatt vs. Ambrose might be the closest thing we have seen to a Buzz Sawyer/Tommy Rich slug fest since the two destroyed Atlanta back in the early 1980s. The feud between Wyatt and Ambrose is what hardcore wrestling should be. Ambrose and Wyatt are the perfect combination of oil and vinegar mixed with some pepper to add a splash of change.

But while other “oddities” in wrestling have been good for business, the aggression between these two superstars is worth a ticket, it will not lead either one to a title any time soon.

Not to worry, the greatest oddity of my generation – Kevin Sullivan – did not win a world title in his career either.

Known as the heel “Boston Battler”, Sullivan’s “devil worshiping” gimmick started during this time. In CWF he became associated with “Maniac” Mark Lewin (Purple Haze), Bob Roop, The Lock and Luna Vachon amongst others as the Army of Darkness. Sullivan split his time with International Championship Wrestling and brought the devil-worshiping gimmick there, along with Lewin and Roop. He had the Fallen Angel as his valet, who later became known as Woman. Sullivan was the top heel in ICW when the company first went national and had noted feuds with Austin Idol, Superstar Billy Graham, Bruiser Brody, Joe Savoldi and Blackjack Mulligan.

His cult-like following and his “pure evil” in his voice and his ability was the perfect foil for the Dusty Rhodes led early 1980s savior of professional wrestling angle.

Now that he is on his own, will Wyatt jump through the minutiae and finally take a stab at the WWE World Title? By the same token, will Ambrose jump into the title picture (especially if Seth Rollins claims the title with his MITB contract) or will he become another hardcore legend?

MIZDOW FOR LIFE

I did not particularly like the tag team match which led to The Miz and Damien Mizdow claiming the WWE Tag Team Titles, but I love the angle that is soon to happen between the Title holders.

Finally, Mizdow (or Sandow) will split and the birth of a feud that could help save their careers. I have been waiting for Sandow to become a headliner. While this feud may not lead to that, it may finally put Sandow over as a viable face in the company.

I have always thought of Sandow as a bit of Nick Bockwinkle, a touch of Lanny Paffo and a sprinkle of Randy Savage. That’s some pretty high praise, but if the feud does come about, Sandow will get over huge with the WWE Universe.

SISTERLY LOVE

It appears the WWE rumors may be correct of a potential AJ Lee retirement. But what was more important than a squash match between Nikki Bella and Lee was the fact Brie Bella seemed to be cheering her sister on. Hopefully, that is a plow which will lead to a Sister vs. Sister Match for the WWE Divas Title.

The fans will finally get the dream matchup they have wanted for some time.

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Lucha Underground is Worth Your Time

November 24, 2014 By: Category: WWE | Pro Wrestling

Lucha Underground (originally named Lucha Uprising) is a new professional wrestling series produced by United Artists Media (Mark Burnett – Survivor) and it every Wednesday for one hour on the newer El Rey Network.

El Rey is a small network seen roughly in 40 million homes. The debut show saw roughly 8,000 viewers, with an average now of between 14,000 and 29,000 viewers. For a small network, those numbers still seem very low.

This new Mexican pro wrestling style based series debuted at the end of October and features for World Wrestling Entertainment and the defunct World Championship Wrestling stars like Chavo Guerrero, Konnan, Jr. John Morrison (Wrestling in Lucha Underground as Johnny Mundo) and Big Ryck (formally Ezekiel Jackson in WWE and Rycklon in his short run in Impact Wrestling).

Behind the announce table you have former WWE interviewer Matt Stryker and former WCW wrestler Vampiro. Lucha Underground also features some of the best wrestlers from Mexico and the independent scene. The first series of television tapings were filmed in Boyle Heights, CA in what is called The Temple. From what I read, the fans in attendance were “extras” told how to cheer and when to cheer. When watching the crowd you can tell this might very well be the case.

Despite the low ratings, sometimes rookie type announcing, cheesy back stage skits that look like a cheap Spanish soap opera, it’s the in ring product itself that I am impressed with and refreshing to watch wrestling talent that I have never heard of before. Although, the commentary doesn’t feel force scripted like WWE or TNA.   Overall Stryker and Vampiro are a unique team.

Some of the production quality I do like is the showing scenes of the city and the outside of the building before taking the fans inside The Temple – Ring of Honor and Impact Wrestling take notice as it is the little things such as this that can add improvement to the opening of your shows and adds a more of a big league feel to the show. For some, this may not matter all that much, but for me it makes the show look and feel like I’m watching a big time NFL game. However, I do like the above the ring shots which TNA has done, but the Lucha Underground production crew over exposes and over uses the above the ring shots way too much, so after just a few weeks, it doesn’t feel different anymore.

For a wrestling show that is produced by a reality television series group, the production overall isn’t bad, and with Chavo Guerrero on the production crew, the production part of the show one would hope would continue to see improvement overall in time as the show progresses.

If you are used to the WWE, Impact Wrestling, and/or ROH style of wrestling, or if you are looking for something unique and different, and you are able to get the El Rey network with the your cable or satellite provider, I would encourage you to give Lucha Underground a chance.

If you can get past the hokey stuff, and focus on the in ring action, I think you will be pleased. Until Impact Wrestling returns in January 2015 and we see what changes they make, Lucha Underground and ROH has more wrestling in one hour of each their programs that the five hours WWE has with Raw and SmackDown.

Yes, Lucha Underground a lot at times feels low budget – like a cheap 1980’s Spanish bad guy vs. good guy movie, but with wrestling in the mix, however, if you have been turned off by the current boring WWE product, don’t have a Sinclair station in your market and may not have Destination America as a part of your cable or satellite package and you have the El Rey network, I would encourage you to give Lucha Underground a try.

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WWE Survivor Series 2014 Results: Sting Debuts, Team Cena Win

November 23, 2014 By: Category: WWE | Pro Wrestling

The WWE rewarded its free subscribers with one of the most memorable show finishes in years. The Survivor Series 2014 delivered with an outstanding main-event and one of the biggest debuts in years. Sting is finally in and the questions surrounding his WrestleMania plans have been answered.

This one-match, one-angle show delivered a memorable evening with fans coming away counting down the hours until RAW. The long road to WrestleMania 31 became clearer at Survivor Series and while there are still plenty of questions, we are finally starting to get some pieces of the Mania puzzle. I don’t think there has been a show this memorable since WrestleMania and it will be exciting to see where things go from here starting tomorrow night.

The show opened up with Vince McMahon dropping a “bombshell.” McMahon told Triple H and Stephanie McMahon that if their team lost, not only would they be out of power, but only one man could bring them back. Vince told them that man was John Cena. Cena told them that when his team wins they will never be in power again. Hunter did not look happy at all.

The Authority are out! Team Cena survived to throw the Authority out of power. This was a real hot match and far exceeded most expectations fans had going into the event. The match went close to an hour which probably hasn’t happened in a WWE main-event in years. The match started with The Big Show eliminating Mark Henry within seconds with a knockout punch. The crowd went nuts. They set up a big spot early for Luke Harper and Erick Rowan to lock up but Harper tagged right out. Ryback and Rusev set up a big lockup for Rusev’s first appearance in the match. The fans really got behind Ryback when he clotheslined Rusev. The match broke out into a big brawl at this point. The fans were great and really made this match seem like something special. Rusev eliminated Ryback to even up the sides. Rollins took a backdrop over the top rope onto about eight guys. Rusev dumped Ziggler onto the rest of the pile. Rusev missed a big dive onto Dolph and went through the announcer’s table. Rusev was counted out after missing the dive as Ziggler rolled back into the ring to make the count. Rowan and Harper finally got into it after about thirty minutes. Kane broke it up after Rowan hit a spin kick on Harper. Harper hit a clothesline on Rowan after Rollins distracted Harper and pinned him. The Big Show turned on John Cena (again) and KO’d him setting him up for the pin. Seth Rollins pinned him and eliminated the captain. The Big Show walked out at that point leaving Dolph Ziggler to fight Kane, Rollins, and Harper all by himself. Ziggler fought back to eliminate Kane to take it down to a 2 on 1 match. Ziggler eliminated Harper bringing it down to Rollins and Ziggler. Ziggler really made himself a star tonight. Ziggler kept fighting back for near falls on Rollins, including a close small package and a DDT. Ziggler hit the Zig Zag and was about to get the win before Triple H pulled the referee out of the ring. Ziggler hit another one but there was no referee to count. Triple H attacked the next referee that came out and finally took his jacket off. Hunter began pounding on Ziggler. Hunter hit the pedigree on Ziggler. The lights went out and Sting walked out on the ramp (with some corny music unfortunately). Hunter just stared. The fans loved it and gave him the reaction you’d expect. Sting took out referee Scott Armstrong. Sting and Hunter squared off. The fans all chanted “Sting” and “This is awesome!” Sting laid Hunter out with a Scorpion Death Drop. Sting then put Ziggler on top of Rollins and walked out. Ziggler got the three-count and the win for Team Cena and what has to be one of the most exciting WWE matches of 2014. Michael Cole called it the most historic moment in Survivor Series history (hey remember that 1997 match. The Authority is done…well at least until tomorrow night. Cena came out to congratulate Ziggler at the end. Stephanie and Triple H sat in the ring as the crowd chanted “Goodbye.”

This is the kind of cliffhanger ending fans have been waiting to see for months on WWE special events. I don’t think it’s a big secret to say that the WWE has been somewhat stale over the last several months. Sting’s debut, Dolph with a push, and the Authority seemingly out of power for the first time in over a year will give the WWE the fresh programming it desperately needed. The show ended with the fans yelling “You got fired” and Stephanie having a temper tantrum.

I think it is safe to say that we know our WrestleMania direction. It looks like it will be Sting vs. Triple H at Mania which is what it is. I am sure it will be a decent match and it will definitely be hot, but it is hardly the classic Undertaker match fans hoped to see Sting get at Mania. Regardless, you have Sting on Mania and the fans have wanted it for years. It could still happen with Sting vs. Hunter at the Rumble but I wouldn’t bank on it.

Bray Wyatt defeated Dean Ambrose by disqualification. Wyatt dared Ambrose to hit him with a chair and he did. Ambrose was disqualified for it. Ambrose proceeded to beat the hell out of Wyatt, including dropping a flying elbow onto Wyatt through a table and giving him a DDT on a chair. Ambrose left him laid out in a pile of hardcore trash from tables to chairs. Ambrose climbed a ladder and stood over Wyatt as his music played. They announced a TLC rematch at TLC in three weeks.

I have said it before and I’ll say it again. Ambrose should be the focus of the company right now. He has a unique charisma to himself that is second only to Brock Lesnar. The focus will be on Roman Reigns in a few weeks and I think that is a big mistake. This guy is the future and he should be groomed for the WrestleMania moment, not Reigns or anyone else in my opinion.

Another piece of news coming out of the show is that live on the WWE Network Monday night following RAW will be a podcast with Steve Austin. Austin will be hosting the podcast and his guest will be Vince McMahon. I think it’s long overdue that the WWE get the Stone Cold podcast on the WWE Network. I love the ingenuity here of debuting it with Vince McMahon. It should be a great show.

Brie Bella seemingly turned heel and the rumors about AJ Lee leaving after Survivor Series appear to be true (although the latest reports indicate she’s staying). Nikki Bella defeated AJ to win the WWE Divas title in about a minute. Brie wound up kissing AJ which distracted her enough for Nikki to swoop in, scoop her up for the Rack Attack and pin her for the title. Brie had a big smile on her face and was celebrating with Nikki. They referenced AJ doing the same thing to Daniel Bryan during his match with Sheamus a couple of years ago at WrestleMania so maybe Nikki is a face? Who the hell knows! Hey, thank goodness that terrible angle is over but this turn made no sense. It also won’t do Daniel Bryan much good when he returns.

Another piece of news coming out of the show is that live on the WWE Network December 1 following RAW will be a podcast with Steve Austin. Austin will be hosting the podcast and his guest will be Vince McMahon. I think it’s long overdue that the WWE get the Stone Cold podcast on the WWE Network. I love the ingenuity here of debuting it with Vince McMahon. It should be a great show. How coincidental that the podcast airs on December 1, the day after all of the free memberships end.

Full WWE Survivor Series 2014 results and winners…
Team Cena (John Cena, Dolph Ziggler, Big Show, Erick Rowan and Ryback) defeated Team Authority (Seth Rollins, Kane, Mark Henry, Rusev and Luke Harper) in a traditional Survivor Series elimination tag team match; if Team Authority loses, they will no longer be in power. If Team Cena loses, all team members will be fired from WWE.
Nikki Bella defeated AJ for the WWE Divas Championship
Adam Rose and the Bunny defeated Titus O’Neil and Heath Slater
Bray Wyatt defeated Dean Ambrose via DQ
The Miz and Damien Mizdow defeated Gold and Stardust (c) vs. The Usos (Jimmy Uso and Jey Uso) vs. Los Matadores (Diego and Fernando)  in a Fatal 4-Way tag team match to win the WWE Tag Team Championship
Alicia Fox, Emma, Naomi and Natalya defeated Paige, Cameron, Layla and Summer Rae in a Divas Traditional Survivor Series elimination tag team match
Jack Swagger defeated Cesaro
Fandango defeated Justin Gabriel

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The WWE History Of The Big Show Turns

November 23, 2014 By: Category: WWE | Pro Wrestling

The Big Show turned yet once again at Survivor Series, taking out captain John Cena and aligning with the Authority. A look back at Show’s untrustworthy history tells you that Cena and every one on his team should have expected it. You can’t trust the Big Show!

The turns of The Big Show have become something of a running joke among longtime WWE fans. One week he is on the side of good fighting evil and the next he is aligned with the corporation out to destroy John Cena. You never know which Big Show you are going to get which is why I thought it would be fun with the help of Google and Wikiepedia to look back on all of The Big Show’s turn during his WWE career.

All in all I counted over 20 turns here although to be fair some of them weren’t full-fledged turns yet for the sake of this list they are being counted. 21 turns since 1999 is amazing although after RAW I’d have to guess that Kane would be honing in on this record. Let’s have some fun and relive the roller coaster ride of The Big Show’s emotions.

– A few months after “Big Nasty” entered the WWE he wound up in a feud with Mick Foley. Following the feud Nasty KO’d Vince McMahon and joined the Union to fight the Corporation.

– Show winds up turning heel again four months later and forms a tag team with The Undertaker feuding with Kane and X-Pac

– Less than three months later Show turns face during the infamous “Big Show Father is Dead” storyline and feuds with Prince Albert and the Big Bossman.

– Three months after Show turns face he turns heel again at the Royal Rumble where he wound up getting into it with The Rock. Show was eliminated by The Rock in the Rumble which started a feud between the two.

– Immediately after WrestleMania Show starts doing those goofy impersonations of other wrestlers (remember the Showster?) which of course turned him babyface. He wound up feuding with Shane McMahon.

– Two months after losing to Shane at Judgment Day Show turned heel again. Show acted as if he was going to go after Shane McMahon but instead wound up attacking The Undertaker. Show and Shane formed “The Conspiracy” with Chris Benoit, Kurt Angle, and Edge and Christian.

– Show turns babyface again, pledging loyalty to the WWE throughout the Invasion angle and feuded specifically with Shane once again. He also formed the Show Gunns with Billy Gunn.

– Show turns heel again right after WrestleMania X-8. Show attacks Steve Austin and joins (or re-joins) the n.W.o.

– The Big Show returns after a lengthy injury-related absence and turns babyface once again after choosing to wrestle Kurt Angle at No Mercy 2004.

– The Big Show is drafted over to ECW and becomes the top heel in the company. Show attacks Tajiri, Super Crazy, and the F.B.I. at One Night Stand and winds up winning the title after Paul Heyman turns on Rob Van Dam.

– The Big Show seemingly turned babyface when a slimmer Show returned at No Way Out in 2008 only to turn back heel immediately by attacking Rey Mysterio thus turning twice in one night.

– Show winds up turning babyface over the course of the next few weeks when WWE fans reject Floyd Mayweather Jr. as the babyface in their feud. Show becomes something of a hero representing the WWE. Show officially turns babyface right after WrestleMania and begins feuding with the Great Khali.

– Show goes heel again in a few months after aligning himself with Vickie Guerrero in her feud against The Undertaker. Show attacked Undertaker at Unforgiven and began interfering in his matches.

– Show teases another babyface turn when he winds up with a spot on Team RAW. Show actually winds up turning on Team RAW to reveal he was a SmackDown guy all along. So in a sense he never really turned since he was a heel in the place.

– In April 2010 The Big Show KO’s The Miz after they lost the unified tag team championship which immediately turns him babyface (of course!)

– The Big Show returns after a lengthy absence in May 2012 with an “ironclad” contract as the henchmen of John Laurinaitis and begins a feud with John Cena.

– In March 2013 The Big Show helps Randy Orton and Sheamus against The Shield turning him somewhat babyface although this was never a full-fledged turn.

- Show “turns heel” (if you consider his alliance with Sheamus and Orton an turn) and KO’s Orton and Sheamus after losing a six-man tag team match to The Shield at WrestleMania 29. Show was mad nobody tagged him in which if you think about it actually makes him a bit of a babyface.

– Show returns from another lengthy absence and continues his feud with The Shield and thus makes a full-fledged babyface turn aligning with Mark Henry and RVD. Show and Henry were scheduled to have a long run as a team here until Henry got hurt.

– Show turned twice in one night once again in October when he KO’s Daniel Bryan at Battleground only to turn around and turn babyface once again by KO’ing Randy Orton.

In other words don’t trust this man WWE Universe! He’ll be with Steph and Triple H before you know it.

Big Show officially made his babyface turn by teaming with Randy Orton and Sheamus vs. The Shield at WrestleMania 29.

Update: The Big Show turns on Team Cena at the Survivor Series, KO’ing Cena and walking off of the team.

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WWE SmackDown Results and November 21 Recap

November 23, 2014 By: Category: WWE | Pro Wrestling

Michael Cole is in the ring, and he welcomes Triple H to the ring, who comes down alone. Cole points out Survivor Series being two days away, then mentions the stipulations for Team Cena vs. Team Authority, laid out by Mr. McMahon. Does Trips realize this could be the final night he is able to conduct an interview like this? Trips warns him to pick his questions carefully, otherwise this could be Cole’s last interview ever. Cole agrees and points out the fact that the WWE Universe loathes him. They can’t stand him or Steph. Can Trips imagine the euphoria if Team Authority loses?

He points out a bunch of sports moments, including the “Miracle on Ice”, then asks if Trips realizes it would be like those moments. Trips says the Universe’s opinions don’t matter. Without the fans, there would be no WWE, but without the Authority, there are no fans. He and his wife make decisions every day based on the best interest of everybody in the WWE Universe. But like little kids, their opinion of him when he makes those decisions is absolutely irrelevant. Cole says it’s statements like that are why many people are speculating that it’s for the Authority’s legacy, that their egos are so out of control that they’ve completely lost sight of the task at hand. Because of these egos, they can’t lead, and that leadership is being questioned heading into Survivor Series. Cole then asks Trips to address these rumors. Trips says that he’s got a bit of a secret. He gets in Cole’s face and says life is a marathon, not a sprint. He got the nickname “The Cerebral Assassin” during the Attitude Era, the greatest era in history. During that time, the talent was unbelievable: Bret Hart, Shawn Michaels, the Undertaker, Steve Austin, the Rock, Triple H…they were the elite of the elite. Now, some could argue that some of those guys were more popular or bigger stars than Trips. What’s not an argument is that they are all gone, and he’s still here. The truth is they could never last, because he’s smarter than all of them. He’s always been smarter, and that means the Authority always wins. They are the constant, and they will always be here, like it or not. Cole says that, if the Authority loses Sunday, he’ll be gone, too. If that happens, what will happen on RAW when the Authority is no longer in charge. Trips says Vince McMahon is the greatest mind that has ever existed in wrestling. Without Vince, the WWE does not exist. He did it because he was smarter than everyone else. He outlasted them all. All of this is because of him, and WWE exists because of him. It’s not ego or bragging when he says there are two people who can take Vince’s place, that can do what he does: one is his wife, and Cole is standing in the ring with the other one. Without them, this place has no future. You take them out of the occasion, he gives WWE max 2 years. That’s not going to happen. If it does, it’ll be about 3 months before everyone is begging them to come back. Without them, WWE is a sinking ship. It has no future. Cole asks what we can expect if Team Authority wins on Sunday. Trips calls that an interesting question. When they win, what happens on RAW? He points out Cole’s interview with John Cena on Wednesday when Cole asked him the same question. Trips wants to show the footage, but first, he wants Team Cena to hear the answer, then he wants them to hear his response to that question.

Team Cena, led by Ziggler, make their way out. Cena is nowhere to be found. Cole mentions the interview again, and he wants to play back a part where he asked Cena if he feels responsible for the fate of his team. We go to the footage, and Cena says he’s given that a lot of thought. He knows he’s asking the team to make a leap of faith and put their livelihood on the line. The Authority will hold that thought with vengeance, and that’s why Team Cena has to win. Back to the ring, Trips mocks Cena, then tells Team Cena that they better hope Cena’s feelings cover all of that. On RAW, after Team Cena has lost, every single one of Team Cena are fired. All the members look concerned, with Erick Rowan staring at his mask.

Rusev and Lana come out and walk their way through Team Cena and down to the ring.

MATCH 1: WWE UNITED STATES CHAMPION RUSEV (W/LANA) VS. DOLPH ZIGGLER (NON-TITLE)
Ziggler ducks a charge, but Ruzev grabs him, lifts him up and knocks him to the floor with a forearm. Rusev rolls outside, but Ziggler is back in. Rusev misses a charge, and Ziggler starts pelting him with rights before running into a back elbow. Rusev stomps Ziggler in the face, then tosses him to the corner for some kicks. He comes back with some shots of his own, ending with a dropkick. Rusev shakes it off and nails him with kneelifts. Ziggler low-bridges Rusev, then hits him with a hotshot and a dropkick that sends him into the barricade from the apron. Outside, Ziggler goes on the attack and goes for a whip into the steps. Rusev reverses, sending Ziggler back-first into them. Commercials.

Back from the break, Rusev has Ziggler in a head-and-arm choke. Rusev counters with a jawbreaker, nails a back elbow, avoids a corner charge and rolls Rusev up for 2. He goes for a rocker dropper, and Rusev catches him in a powerbomb. Ziggler counters that into a sunset flip for 2. He charges at Rusev again, Rusev catches him and goes for a fall-away slam. Ziggler lands on his feet and nails a superkick for 2. Ziggler hits a corner splash, then another and goes into some mounted punches. Rusev shoves him off and hits a spinning heel kick. Rusev goes for a powerslam, but Ziggler escapes. He goes for the Zig-Zag, but Rusev hangs onto the top rope. He turns around and hits Ziggler with a vertical splash, stomps Ziggler in the back and looks for the Accolade. Ziggler escapes and hits the Zig-Zag. He crawls over to Rusev for the pin, but only gets 2. Ziggler misses the rocker dropper and he goes for a leaping DDT. Rusev tosses him off. Ziggler lands on his feet, but is then immediately dropped by a jumping side kick for 3.

WINNER: RUSEV.

After the match, Rusev stomps Ziggler in the back and applies the Accolade for a few moments.

We see Corporate Kane on his phone in the office, when he’s interrupted by someone. Kane is glad this person is here, because they have important matters to discuss. It cuts over to Cesaro, and he says he always comes when the Authority calls. Kane says that, although Cesaro is not officially on Team Authority, his loyalty has not gone unnoticed, and it will be rewarded when Team Cena is eliminated. Cesaro likes that, and talks about embarassing Cena this past week on RAW. Cena thought Cesaro was joining Team Cena. Kane calls that funny, but what wasn’t funny was when Erick Rowan joined Cena’s flock of misguided sheep. So tonight, he wants Cesaro to do one more favor for the Authority: slaughter the lamb that is Rowan. Cesaro agrees and says, “Long live the Authority. Cesaro out.”

MATCH 2: THE MIZ AND DAMIEN MIZDOW VS. LOS MATADORES (DIEGO AND FERNANDO, W/EL TORITO)
We get an inset promo from Miz. He’s blathering about how he’ll win the WWE Tag Team titles at Survivor Series. The Usos, and Gold & Stardust are both on commentary. Miz and a Matador start, with Miz applying an arm wringer. The Matador, Diego, counters with his own, then gets in a roll-up for 2. He nails a dropkick and tags in Fernando, who hits a tope con hilo. The two crisscross before Fernando nails Mizdow. Miz nails Fernando with a clothesline, then applies a rear chinlock. Fernando comes back with a jawbreaker. Miz goes for the Reality Check, but Fernando shoves him off. Mizdow tags himself in and looks for the Reality Check and hits it before kipping up. Miz tags himself back in and he goes for the SKF. Fernando escapes and tags in Diego. Diego hits a springboard chop and a spinning headbutt. He connects with a second one, ducks a clothesline and hits a spinning headscissors before clotheslining Miz to the floor. Diego goes for a baseball slide and misses. Miz looks to throw Diego into the Usos, but Fernando reverses. Mizdow sees this and throws himself into the tag champs. Back in the ring, Diego hits a top rope cross-body for 3.

WINNERS: LOS MATADORES.

Dean Ambrose comes down to the ring, and he supposedly has a survival kit for his match with Bray Wyatt on Sunday. He says he’s not your average WWE superstar. They say he’s eccentric and has a screw loose. That’s fine, and he doesn’t care. He’s a survivor, and he will continue to survive no matter who or what stands in his way. He tells a story about when he was a kid. His mom handed him a $20-bill and told him to buy some cigarettes and scratch tickets. He’s walking down the street, and he runs into some older guys who want to know what he’s carrying him. They rough him up and take the money, leaving his mom empty-handed. He told his mom what happened. She took out a pair of brass knuckles and told him to not let it ever happen again. The knucks were his survival kit, and he takes that survival kit with him everywhere he goes. He’s a walking, talking survival kit, and at Survivor Series, he’ll break Wyatt’s nose and teeth. He’s going to bounce his fist off Wyatt’s skull, and he’s not going to stop until his knuckles bleed. If Wyatt wants to survive, he needs the ability to run. Wyatt’s said a lot of things, and some of it was true. He got under Ambrose’s skin, and that’s bad for him. Wyatt’s talking to a grown man. Ambrose is the hunter, and Wyatt is the prey. At Survivor Series, Wyatt will be stalked, tormented and ultimately put down.

Wyatt appears on the big screen in a cage and has a question: is this what it was like? Is this how you remember him? Locked in a cage, like an animal? When Ambrose looks at him, is he reminded of his dad? His dad gave him life, then left him alone to rot in it. Wyatt came here to remind Ambrose the apple does not fall far from the tree. This cage is Ambrose’s future, trapped in a prison of his own design. He’ll be begging for freedom he won’t receive, praying to a deity that doesn’t exist. The walls will close in, but it didn’t have to be like this. He and Ambrose could have ruled the world, but Ambrose changed all that. Instead, Wyatt will leave this cell, then he’ll leave Ambrose drowning in a pool of his own filth, just like daddy did. It will never end in here.

I really can’t do Wyatt’s half of that segment justice. He’s just too damn good.

MATCH 3: BRIE BELLA (W/NIKKI BELLA) VS. WWE DIVAS CHAMPION AJ LEE (NON-TITLE)
Lee comes out dressed as Nikki, mocking her mannerisms in the process. Lee is a far better-looking Nikki than Nikki herself. The two lock-up, and Lee breaks it before ducking a clothesline. She continues to mock Nikki until Brie takes her down with a waistlock. Lee breaks it and applies a side headlock. Brie tries to counter, but Lee stays on top of her. Brie counters with a headscissors, but Lee breaks it and hits a kick. Brie comes back with a shot and throws Lee to the corner before Lee hits another kick and slams her head into the buckles. She bounces Brie’s head off her chest, then whips her down. Lee mounts her, takes out the fake breast she had in her top, then hits Brie in the face with it. Brie comes back with a half-Boston crab, but Lee gets a rope-break. Lee locks in a guillotine, which Brie breaks by throwing her into the buckles. Lee hits a pair of knees out of the corner and a clothesline. A neckbreaker gets 2, and Brie comes back with a dropkick. She hits a running knee against the ropes, then hits a missile dropkick from the second rope for 2. Nikki jumps on the apron and screams for Brie to finish it. Lee shoves Brie into Nikki, then rolls her up in a schoolgirl for 3.

WINNER: AJ LEE.

After the match, Nikki gives Brie one of the weakest shoves I’ve ever seen in my life as Lee celebrates on the stage.

MATCH 4: CESARO VS. ERICK ROWAN
Now that Rowan and Luke Harper are no longer a team, it’s time to give them their own distinct entrance themes. Cesaro slaps the sheep mask off Rowan, then starts nailing him with shots. Rowan grabs him by the neck and throws him to the floor. Outside, Rowan continues the assault before rolling Cesaro back into the ring. Cesaro hits a shoulder, then nails a forearm before looking for a suplex back into the ring. Rowan blocks it and comes back in, but Cesaro hits him with a dropkick. He nails a few more shots before Rowan catches him in a bearhug. Cesaro counters into a sunset flip, but Rowan powers him up by his neck. They trade shots until Rowan hits a bodyslam. On the apron, Cesaro hits a hotshot, then jumps on Rowan’s back for a sleeper. Rowan falls into the buckles to break it, and Cesaro kicks him away. Cesaro goes up top, and Rowan launches him back down to the mat. He hits a running shoulderblock, then drops Cesaro with a pumphandle backbreaker. He picks Cesaro up with an Argentinian backbreaker and gets the submission win.

WINNER: ERICK ROWAN.

Luke Harper walks down to the ring. Rowan challenges him to step in, but Rowan changes his mind at the last minute…then changes it again…and again.

Renee Young is standing by with Team Cena (and Erick Rowan is playing with a Rubik’s Cube for some reason). She asks for their reaction to what Triple H stated earlier tonight. Big Show says what Trips said made all of them think. They could lose their jobs. But so can Trips and Steph. Trips’ tactics didn’t have the intended effect. They’re not cowards, and they want to rid the WWE of the Authority. They’re not going to hide. They’re in this far, and they’re going to finish it. Ryback says actions have consequences. He knew he was taking a risk by joining Team Cena, and now that his job is one the line. That just makes “The Big Guy” hungrier. Tonight, he and Show are going to feed on Corporate Kane and Seth Rollins. On Sunday, the Authority’s empire is going to crumble, courtesy of Team Cena and Team Ryback. Dolph Ziggler says the Authority has put him through the ringer week after week. On Monday, he lost the IC title. It wasn’t just his; he shared that title with the WWE Universe. So, is he afraid of losing his job? There’s nothing to fear when you have nothing to lose and everything to gain. They have a chance to put the Authority out of power, and he’s not going to back down now. Young asks if Rowan has anything to add. He simply says “Freedom”. The rest of the team repeat it and put their fists together.

MATCH 5: SETH ROLLINS AND CORPORATE KANE (W/ROLLINS SECURITY) VS. THE BIG SHOW AND RYBACK
The ring announcer informs us Erick Rowan and Dolph Ziggler are banned from ringside before the opening bell. Ryback and Rollins start, with Ryback powering Rollins to the corner. He whips Rollins hard across the ring, and Rollins rolls to the floor. Back in the ring, Rollins hits a few punches, then clubs Ryback across the back. Ryback comes back with a Thesz press, then he grabs Rollins by the ears and slams his head into the mat. In the corner, Show tags in and hits a body blow before landing a big chop to the chest. Rollins gets whipped back into the corner, where Show hits him with another chop. Show drops him with a headbutt, then walks across his stomach. In the corner again, Ryback tags in and hits a chop of his own. In the adjacent corner, Ryback slams Rollins’ head into the buckle. Rollins comes back with chops, but Ryback no-sells them. He blocks a kick and shoves Rollins to the mat. Rollins gets whipped across the ring, blocks a charge and comes off the middle rope. Ryback catches him and hits a swinging powerslam. He calls for Shell Shocked, but instead boots an incoming Kane to the floor. Rollins charges in, and Ryback backdrops him to the floor as well. Triple H’s music hits, and he walks down to ringside, followed by the rest of Team Authority. Commercials.

Back from the break, Show is in control of Kane, hitting him with a bodyslam. Show lands a big elbow for 2, then sends Kane into the ropes. Kane counters with a DDT, then tags in Rollins, who repeatedly kicks Show in the face before hitting a dropkick for 2. Show kicks out with authority, but Rollins is quickly back in the ring. He hits a few more kicks, then drops Show with a right. Kane tags in, and they take turns putting the boots to Show before Kane hits an elbow for 2. Kane applies a rear chinlock, but Show eventually powers up to his feet and hits a back suplex. Rollins and Ryback both tag in. Ryback hits a forearm to the chest and a back-body drop. He hits Rollins with a gorilla press into a powerslam, then calls for the Meat Hook. Outside, Team Authority attack Show, leading to the DQ.

WINNERS VIA DISQUALIFICATION: THE BIG SHOW AND RYBACK.

After the match, Rollins tries for the curb stomp on Ryback, but Ryback avoids it and goes for Shell Shocked. He drops Rollins when Jamie Noble tries to interfere. Ryback puts Noble down, then hits Rollins with a standing spinebuster. Joey Mercury gets in and attacks Ryback from behind, with Noble joining in. They beat him down in the corner until Dolph Ziggler runs down and wipes them out. Luke Harper enters the ring and drops Ziggler with a big boot. Erick Rowan makes his way down now, boots Mark Henry on the floor, nails Rusev with a clothesline, then gets in the ring with Harper. Harper screams at him, then offers a handshake. The distraction is enough for Kane to re-enter the ring and put Rowan down with a chokeslam. He turns around into a standing spinebuster from Ryback. Ryback turns around and gets dropped with a discus clothesline from Harper. Ziggler takes Harper down with a Zig-Zag. Rusev drops Ziggler with a jumping side kick. Henry then puts Ziggler down again with a World’s Strongest Slam. Triple H enters the ring, and Team Authority stomps everyone down. Show lets out a big scream from ringside and enters the ring. Team Authority try to beat him down as he enters the ring, but he tosses them all off. He starts hitting everyone with chops, then hits Rollins Security with a double chokeslam. Trips brings a chair into the ring, hits Show in the gut, then cracks it over his back. Rollins then hits Show with a curb stomp. Ryback gets the chair treatment, as does Ziggler. Show and Rowan get a few shots from the chair. Rusev picks Ziggler up, and Trips assaults him with the chair yet again. Rusev and Kane pick Ryback up, and Trips nails him in the back. Team Authority pick him up once more, and Trips screams in his face, asking if this is what he wanted. Team Cena is done. Trips then puts Ryback down once and for all with a Pedigree.

End of show.

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Surivor Series 2014 Contest: Win WWE Attitude Era Vol. 2 DVD

November 22, 2014 By: Category: Contests, WWE | Pro Wrestling

WWE Attitude Era Vol,. 2I am giving away 1 copy of the WWE Attitude Era Vol. 2 DVD this Sunday night during the Survivor Series. Winning is very easy but you have to be on Twitter to do it. It’s as easy as a Stone Cold Stunner on Mr. McMahon!

Follow me @CamelClutchBlog and look for the contest tweet when the Survivor Series begins. You must RT the tweet and give me your prediction on the winner of the main-event. Just RT the tweet with either Team Authority or Team Cena to enter. That’s it! It’s that simple but you have to be on Twitter to enter.

Look for this tweet – “RT & Follow to win a #WWE Attitude Era 2 DVD set! Predict which team wins the #SurvivorSeries main-event?”. Just make sure enter the winning team when you RT to enter.

I will pick a winner at random. Every entry that contains a prediction is eligible to win, even if you get the winning team wrong. All you have to do to play is participate. So make sure you are following me between now and Survivor Series, look for the tweet around 8 PM/EST and give me your winner. I’ll announce a winning tweet right after the event on Twitter.

This contest is restricted to U.S. residents only. This contest is not sponsored in any way by the WWE. Good luck!

Read my the WWE Attitude Era Vol. 2 DVD review right here on the CCB!

DISC 1

Bare Essentials

Miss Slammy Swimsuit Competition
Sunny vs. Sable vs. Marlena vs. The Funkettes
Slammy Awards * March 16, 1997

Owen Hart vs. Shawn Michaels
RAW * December 29, 1997

Bad Ass Dad

New Age Outlaws vs. Cactus Jack & Chainsaw Charlie
RAW * January 26, 1998

Intercontinental Championship Match
The Rock vs. Ken Shamrock
Royal Rumble * January 18, 1998

Stone Cold Steve Austin vs. Mr. McMahon
RAW * April 13, 1998

Leather & Chains

Owen Hart & Legion of Doom vs. Triple H & New Age Outlaws
RAW * April 20, 1998

D-Generation X Takes New York
RAW * June 8, 1998

Falls Count Anywhere #1 Contenders Match for the WWE Championship
Mankind vs. “Kane”
RAW * July 6, 1998

Letting the Dogs Out

Bikini Contest
Sable vs. Jacqueline
Fully Loaded * July 26, 1998

Val Venis & Taka Michinoku vs. KaiEnTai
RAW * August 3, 1998

WWE Championship Match
Stone Cold Steve Austin vs. Ken Shamrock
RAW * September 14, 1998

Boot Camp Match for Al Snow’s Contract
Al Snow vs. Sgt. Slaughter
RAW * September 21, 1998

Six-Man Elimination #1 Contenders Match for the European Championship
Edge vs. Gangrel vs. D’Lo Brown vs. Jeff Jarrett vs. Droz vs. Marc Mero
RAW * September 28, 1998

Extreme Name Change

WWE Championship Match
The Rock vs. X-Pac
RAW * November 23, 1998

DISC 2

Becoming a Pimp

Godfather & Val Venis vs. Mark Henry & DLo Brown
Rock Bottom * December 13, 1998

Triple H vs. Edge
RAW * January 11, 1999

Bloodbath

Kane’s Career on the Line
Stone Cold Steve Austin vs. Kane
RAW * March 1, 1999

Hardcore Championship Match
Hardcore Holly vs. Bad Ass Billy Gunn
RAW * March 15, 1999

Wild and Crazy Guys

Handicap Match
The Big Show vs. Triple H & The Rock
RAW * April 5, 1999

Pimpin’ Ain’t Country

Intercontinental Championship Match
Goldust vs. Godfather
RAW * April 12, 1999

The Hardy Boyz vs. Edge & Christian
Shotgun Saturday Night * April 17, 1999

Casket Match
The Rock vs. Undertaker
RAW * May 17, 1999

Intercontinental Championship Match
Jeff Jarrett vs. Test
Sunday Night Heat * June 13, 1999

DISC 3

Drinking with the APA

Tag Team Championship Match
Acolytes vs. Kane & X-Pac
RAW * August 9, 1999

Sexual Chocolate

Mark Henry Sex Therapy Sessions

Valentine’s Day Delight

Mark Henry and Mae Young Get a Room
RAW * February 14, 2000

Triple Threat Match for the European Championship
Kurt Angle vs. Chris Jericho vs. Tazz
RAW * March 13, 2000

Behind Breaking the Walls

Intercontinental Championship Match
Chris Jericho vs. Kurt Angle
RAW * May 8, 2000

Eddie Guerrero vs. Dean Malenko
Sunday Night Heat * June 18, 2000

Intergender Tag Team Match
The Rock & Lita vs. Kurt Angle & Stephanie McMahon-Helmsley
SmackDown * August 24, 2000

Triple Threat Match for the Women’s Championship
Lita vs. Ivory vs. Jacqueline
Sunday Night Heat * September 17, 2000

Weak Stomach

Hardcore Championship Match
Gerald Brisco vs. Crash Holly
RAW * June 5, 2000

Evening Gown Match for the Hardcore Championship
Gerald Brisco vs. Pat Patterson
King of the Ring * June 25, 2000

Wanna Ride?

Intergender Tag Team Match
The Rock & Lita vs. Triple H & Trish Stratus
RAW * July 31, 2000

BLU-RAY EXCLUSIVES

The Undertaker Attends His Parents Funeral
RAW * April 20, 1998

#1 Contenders Match for the Tag Team Championship
Kane & Mankind vs. Owen Hart & The Rock
Sunday Night Heat * August 2, 1998

Golga vs. Marc Mero
RAW * August 3, 1998

Hardcore Championship Match
Al Snow vs. Road Dogg
RAW * January 4, 1999

Lumberjack Match
Stone Cold Steve Austin vs. The Rock
RAW * May 3, 1999

Gangrel & Christian vs. Droz & Prince Albert
Sunday Night Heat * May 16, 1999

WWE Championship Match
Triple H vs. Mr. McMahon
SmackDown * September 16, 1999

Mark Henry and Mae Young Double Date
RAW * December 27, 1999

The APA Opens Their Doors
RAW * January 31, 2000

Last Man Standing Match
Triple H vs. Chris Jericho
Fully Loaded * July 23, 2000