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WWE Champ Seth Rollins Tells the Camel Clutch Blog to Suck It and More

WWE world champion Seth Rollins is never one to mince words. The champ sat down with Rolling Stone to talk about breaking John Cena’s nose and oh yes, essentially tell the Camel Clutch Blog to “suck it.”

I noticed traffic coming to my website on Thursday from RollingStone.com so as any good website owner would do, I checked out the backlink. The link took me to a new interview with WWE champion Seth Rollins, who is always a great interview. I was surprised to say the least that the basis of the article was a critical blog written here about the champ back in May.

Don’t get me wrong, I am highly grateful to RollingStone.com writer James Montgomery for the traffic. At the same time I am a little disappointed because I do like Seth Rollins but I’ll certainly stand by my writer and my own opinion. Regardless, here is what the champ said about the criticism here on the CCB.

Speaking of narratives, are you aware of how your reign as WWE Champion has been received? A lot of what I read online has been less-than-complimentary, to put it mildly.
Twitter’s kind of an abridged version of all that; I see enough of it, so I don’t really go out of my way to read the sites or the sheets or anything like that. You have to take everything with a grain of salt, because everyone’s got an opinion, and now, with Twitter and the blogosphere and all that bull crap, everyone has the means to express that opinion, so it’s really hard to gauge an actual response. You just have to go out and do what you do; I know when things I do are good, and I know when they’re not, so I’m not going to lose my confidence over one dude online who’s writing a report that 20 people read. I know that I’m the one who worked for 12 years to get to this point, I’m the one who spent my whole life putting this before my family and friends, I’m the one who sacrificed every relationship I’ve ever had to get to this point, and if that guy sitting on his couch, who never did a thing, wants to point fingers at me and talk to me about my championship reign – even if it’s a good thing – he can suck it. His opinion is irrelevant to me.

To be fair, most of the criticisms have little to do with you and everything to do with the way you’ve been booked – as cowardly and incompetent, a weak champion.

Well, I am a heel. I am a bad guy. The object of being a bad guy is to be hated, and for people to not want you to have the championship. And I’ve had the title for 100-and-whatever days, and every single day of that reign, people have wanted me to lose that title more and more; so in my estimation, I’m doing a bang-up job as WWE World Heavyweight Champion. People have lost sight of what heat is. They don’t understand it, in the era of reality in wrestling, and how smart they are and all this, they’ve lost sight of what actual heat is. So the idea of booking a champion too weak doesn’t exist in my opinion. It’s about the heat.

First, I want to thank the author for putting the article into context. There was never any criticism of Rollins as a performer, it was simply criticising the booking. I won’t speak for Steve Grossi but I will speak on my blog. Rollins says I don’t understand heat. I don’t think it’s that hard to understand heat quite frankly. What I do understand is business (I do have an MBA) and I look at the numbers and the numbers tell me that he is not working as a champion. RAW experienced record low ratings before the SummerSlam season kicked off and there was a real panic in Titan Towers. Vince McMahon also reacted swiftly and moved John Cena back into the closing of RAW and the title picture. I think Rollins is arguably one of the greatest in-ring performers to ever hold the WWE title. I just look at the numbers and see that his title reign is not doing business and in my opinion, that’s not heat.

Rollins was also asked about breaking Cena’s nose.

It was bad. John, being who he is, had no intention of stopping that match, whether his nose was halfway off his face or not, but I knew right away when I hit him; the impact was way harder than I thought it was going to be. I heard his nose pop, and I felt it on my knee – I thought it was his eye socket or something; the way it cracked, I never heard a nose break like that before. The narrative changed after that, but that’s one of the cool things about all this. You can’t do that in any other medium. That visual of him finishing the match, standing there with his nose halfway across his face, that’s something that will be around forever. It’s pretty awesome.

Rollins was also asked about the ban of the Curb Stomp.

Obviously, it was a move that I was partial to, but it didn’t make or break me as a performer. I want to make it clear that it wasn’t banned because of a risk of injury – I’ve never hurt anybody with the move ever. We mislabeled the move to begin with – we gave it a lousy name – and then once I got to this level, we started to notice that I was going to be making a lot of media appearances, and moms were going to be seeing the representative of WWE doing this kind of maneuver, and kids were going to try it and it could go wrong very easily. That’s stuff I don’t think about, but that’s why we have people like Vince McMahon, who have done this for their entire lives – they think about stuff like that, and they keep us alive and not in court settling lawsuits all the time. So we decided to make a switch and change over, and I’m fortunate enough to be in a position to be handed down a move like the Pedigree, that no one else has been able to use as a finish in the past 20 years. So I don’t mind it one bit, and it kind of adds to the character. People say what they will, but at the end of they day, they’re not happy about it, so I’m doing my job.”
Overall it’s a really great interview with Rollins and I’d recommend checking out the entire read over at RollingStone.com

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Eric G.

Eric is the owner and editor-in-chief of the Camel Clutch Blog. Eric has worked in the pro wrestling industry since 1995 as a ring announcer in ECW and a commentator/host on television, PPV, and home video. Eric also hosted Pro Wrestling Radio on terrestrial radio from 1998-2009. Check out some of Eric’s work on his IMDB bio and Wikipedia. Eric has an MBA from Temple University’s Fox School of Business.

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Welcome to the Camel Clutch Blog. The CCB was born in 2007 and features blogs from over 50 different writers. Articles from the Camel Clutch Blog have been featured by some of the world's most respected websites including; CNNSI.com, Foxsports.com, Yahoo News, Business Insider, MSNBC, NBCsports.com, and more.

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