NFL | NCAA Football

NCAA Football: Laremy Tunsil Fallout and Other Thoughts

For some reason, I am going to call “B.S.” on the story coming out on NFL.com that Ole Miss head coach Hugh Freeze was shocked Laremy Tunsil claimed he received improper benefits from the school during his time in the SEC.

Freeze said on an SEC media teleconference Thursday that he was “shocked like everyone else living it out in real time,” per a story in the The Orlando Sentinel. That would suggest the matter wasn’t already part of the ongoing NCAA investigation into potential violations in the Ole Miss football program. Tunsil was selected No. 13 overall by the Miami Dolphins, and the school followed the next day with an announcement that it would investigate the allegations.

Since draft night we’ve had adversity around our place. I know our administration is aggressively working to reach a resolution, and I’m told we’ve made a lot of progress, but facts are more important than speed or a public response,” Freeze said Thursday, per the Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal. “That’s difficult for me, because I want to respond. Our administration is continuing to work with all parties and reach a conclusion as soon as possible. We hope that’s coming quickly.”

This is nothing new for the school, as the program has been under suspicion of NCAA violations for some time involving Tunsil and potentially other members of the football program.

Tunsil has been the subject of much media attention since hours before the NFL Draft when images of him smoking a bong surfaced, which led to him dropping to the Miami Dolphins with the No. 13 pick. It meant the left tackle lost millions of dollars as a result. Tunsil wasn’t shy about stating the school helped his family in a time of need when asked during his post-draft news conference.

Moments like these and accusations are commonplace when it comes to suspicion of rules violations. Tunsil is no longer part of the Rebels program and cannot be harmed for what he stated.

Something tells me this might be the start of something huge in the way of an NCAA investigation of the football program.

APPEALS HEARING GRANTED

Don’t read too much into this, but former Penn State assistant coach Jerry Sandusky has been awarded an appeals hearing, according to the Associated Press.

The story appears on cbssports.com.

Judge John Cleland approved of the appeals hearing, saying it would “provide the defense with an opportunity to prove” the claims, as they continue to seek having the original charges against Sandusky dismissed, or to get a new trial.

Sandusky, a former assistant under the late Joe Paterno, is currently serving 30 to 60 years in prison after being convicted on 45 counts of child sexual abuse. The hearing will take place later this month on May 20.

Sandusky’s lawyers will present a case claiming that prosecutors lied, withheld evidence, and leaked secret grand jury information to find additional victims in Sandusky’s original trial.

HEADDRESSED BANNED

Perry Kostidakis, Editor-in-Chief of FSU News is reporting that the wearing of Native American headdresses has been discouraged at Florida State athletics.

Resolution 15, as described in a document obtained by the FSView, states that “[SGA] requests that the wearing of any Native American headdresses shall no longer be permitted into athletic arenas at FSU.”

The resolution was voted yes by 27 members, no by four and five abstained.

FSU’s mascot is the Seminole Indian. The headdresses that are worn by individuals at sporting events and football games are closer in resemblance to those worn by the Plains region tribes, such as the Sioux, rather than those of the Seminole Tribe.

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