WWE | Pro Wrestling

Kharma Breaks the WWE Mold – Downtown with Darsie

Kharma in the WWEPondering, thinking, drinking some Mello Yello in my arm chair while listening to some paid and free wrestling podcast in my arm chair while my computer was being worked on this past week, I was thinking about what Vincent Kennedy McMahon and what he deems to be the “perfect” sports-entertainer for the business of professional wrestling.

We’ve seen a lot of Triple H‘s, a lot of John Cena‘s, so-on-and-so-forth, I’m sure you get my point. With the news of Kharma getting pregnant and taking a year or so off for the whole pregnancy thing and all the fun stuff of not doing much afterward, I got thinking: Kharma’s different from the WWE Diva mold and the mold all together for the athletes McMahon has for his company.

So the question came to my Philosophical mind. Is signing Kharma and having her on television breaking the mold of what McMahon wants and sees in his superstars and bringing back what professional wrestlers where in the ‘80’s?

Kharma to the “WWE Universe” and Awesome Kong to the Impact Wrestling fans, she’s a different kind of gal to what we’re used to in the professional wrestling ring. The first thing I thought of when I saw Awesome Kong in Impact Wrestling was Bull Nakano when Bull Nakano was feuding with Alundra Blayze (the famous Madusa in WCW who threw the WWF Women’s Championship belt into a trash can on WCW Nitro television) and Bertha Faye.

The reason why I thought of Nakano is she was another bigger size gal in the wrestling world. To be honest, I really don’t remember much of Nakano or her wrestling ability, and haven’t had a desire to put in one of my old-school WWF PPV’s on DVD to watch one of her matches. Bertha Faye, yes, the gal Harvey Wimppleman managed and had a crush on. Don’t remember much about Bertha Faye, but she left an impression on me enough to name my Buick Century after her.

Besides those two lovely bigger women, there really haven’t been any bigger ladies in the business and as of the past decade plus, the business is heavy into bodybuilders as professional wrestlers, and I really don’t like that as being a bigger guy myself. So what’s the point besides going down memory lane like I have so far?

I am on the Kharma train, I’ll admit. Why? I’m on her fan train because I feel that with her signing and making an impact on the biggest wrestling promotion, she’s breaking out of the mold that’s been “in” for the business we all love and follow. I feel like Vince only wants bodybuilders as his “sports-entertainers” and that bothers me because that’s not the norm here in the United States. I don’t even know anyone who’s a bodybuilder! I feel like Kharma is bringing in an era allowing a whole new set of wrestlers who aren’t bodybuilders.

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Like the ‘80’s in the WWF (and other wrestling companies), there were a lot of different bodies for the professional wrestlers. Andre the Giant represented the giants. Big Boss Man, Akeem, and King Kong Bundy represented the overweight people. Randy Savage and Shawn Michaels represented the smaller athletic guys. Hulk Hogan represented the guys who love the gym and were on ‘roids (opps, I mean “sayin’ our prayers, eatin’ our vitamins,…” blah, blah, blah). I’m sure you’re getting my point on the different set of wrestlers.

Philosophical Corner: With everything said, I feel like Kharma is bringing in a new era of wrestlers. The WWE hasn’t seen a variety of real life people as sports-entertainers. I don’t believe that WWE has a real life representation on what kinds of people that is alive these days. Not everyone is a bodybuilder. Heck, I don’t strive to be a bodybuilder. I would like to be healthier, but not like Triple H or John Cena. Kharma represents me on being on a bigger size. I believe Kharma is breaking through on television, bringing in a new era of bodies of professional wrestlers.

Check out more of Eric’s blogs at http://vintagedarsie.wordpress.com/.

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Eric G.

Eric is the owner and editor-in-chief of the Camel Clutch Blog. Eric has worked in the pro wrestling industry since 1995 as a ring announcer in ECW and a commentator/host on television, PPV, and home video. Eric also hosted Pro Wrestling Radio on terrestrial radio from 1998-2009. Check out some of Eric's work on his IMDB bio and Wikipedia. Eric has an MBA from Temple University's Fox School of Business.

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