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WWE NXT is Better Than RAW and SmackDown

February 17, 2015 By: Category: WWE | Pro Wrestling

The evolution NXT has experienced since doing live events on the WWE Network has been simply amazing. In my opinion, ‘NXT Arrival’ on February 27th, 2014 was the day NXT was officially put on the map. Wrestling fans were able to watch NXT on other streaming platforms prior to their debut on the network but they got a better opportunity to see what The Ascension, Paige, Adrian Neville, Bo Dallas, Sami Zayn and others were all about because of the promotion NXT was getting on WWE programing.

Prior to ‘NXT Arrival’, the likes of Cesaro, Bray Wyatt, Daniel Bryan, Dean Ambrose, Rusev, Roman Reigns and Seth Rollins all graced the NXT ring. Today, NXT is five live events in and they have talent like Baron Corbin, Finn Balor, Hideo Itami, Tyler Breeze, Charlotte, Sasha Banks and Kevin Owens bringing down the house.

Something started to change and it was impressive. After the Fatal 4-Way match between Neville, Zayne, Breeze and Tyson Kidd then the Zayn vs. Neville match at ‘R Evolution’ the thought really started creeping into my mind. After ‘Rival’ it solidified my opinion that day in and day out, NXT is a better product than RAW and SmackDown. After ‘NXT TakeOver: Rival’ was over I was so impressed I started to examine why NXT was so good. The reaction NXT received on social media was amazing so I clearly wasn’t alone. One of my buddies whose been a wrestling fan his entire life and someone whose opinion I respect texted me, “There are very few moments that make you feel, ‘that’s why I love wrestling’ and tonight was one of those nights.” It was clear; something special was definitely going on in NXT.

After some of the events over the last month, it’s pretty clear to me that NXT is as good as it is right now because of Triple H. He is the sole decision maker when it comes to booking and he’s nailing it. He has a reputation for burying guys and having a set image for what a superstar should be, but when he was on Stone Cold Steve Austin’s podcast, I was never more confident that he has what it takes to lead the WWE into the future. His vision, ideas and opinions have led to a snowball effect that’s making the entire NXT product the best to watch.

In response to a question on twitter, Tripe H said that he sees NXT “Standing on its own as a brand, but is not only a pipeline-but an alternative.” When I saw that I immediately took it to another level. NXT is now the “better alternative.” It’s obvious that NXT is not a minor league feeder system for the WWE anymore. Right now, today, NXT is a superior product and makes the WWE Network worth the $9.99 all by its self.

His desire for longer storylines and unscripted promos tells me that he gets it and makes me very excited for not only the future of NXT, but of RAW and SmackDown. He is a fan of the slow burn and that’s one of the biggest things lacking in the WWE today. Fans with short attention spans and the desire for instant gratification is really weakening the product. Yes, Daniel Bryan was an example of a slow burn but that was fan created. Bryan winning the WWE Championship at WrestleMania was not the plan. In NXT, the Zayn-Neville program is a prime example. It was a nice, long feud that was capped off with a great moment. As fans, we need to be patience because with main event feuds, the payoff is almost always worth it.

Another thing Triple H talked about with Stone Cold was scripted promos. He likes promos to be more natural and doesn’t believe everything needs to be scripted. Also, with Triple H in charge, the wrestlers have a choice. If a guy likes to be scripted that option will be there for them, but if they have the ability and want to be more impromptu, then they will have the option to ad-lib their promos. Nothing sounds better than a wrestler who can free style a promo. Everything is scripted in the WWE right now and it’s obvious and weakens the product.

Of course there cannot be a strong product without the performance of the wrestlers. There’s a great mix of up-and-comers and experienced indy guys in NXT right now. I honestly believe that if it were up to Vince McMahon, a lot of these guys would not be where they are today. Some of the best workers in NXT history are not typical WWE guys. Owens and Wyatt look out of shape. Neville, Itami and Balor are obviously too small. Bottom line, NXT provides these guys a platform to prove they belong and can be spectacular on the big stage. Also, the willingness to give wrestlers from “Ring of Honor,” “New Japan Pro Wrestling” and other organizations a chance is really changing the game.

Finally, the pacing of NXT is perfect. The weekly shows are an hour and their special events are two hours. On Stone Cold’s podcast Triple H also mentioned how he wished RAW went back to two hours. NXT does not waste time with pointless promos or recap fillers. There are times when RAW will go 20 minutes before any action takes place. Specifically on the special events, the show flows so nicely and is an easy product to watch and enjoy.

So, because of the decision of Triple H, NXT is a better and more enjoyable show than RAW or SmackDown. Everything he believes in is showing, and is creating a ripple effect throughout the organization. From the performers he hires, length of shows, freedom of the promos and the length of programs, NXT is in a great place to not only be an alternative to WWE, but maybe provide the fire of competition they have been lacking for so many years. I will continue to tune into RAW and SmackDown because I enjoy many of the workers, but just know NXT is my show of choice.

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NXT Woman Up: Let Sara Del Rey Have A Run

February 13, 2015 By: Category: WWE | Pro Wrestling

If you’re like me, your jaw was on the floor back in May, watching the tournament final between Charlotte and Natalya to determine the new NXT Women’s Champion. Your jaw went slack because you had no earthly idea that a women’s match under the WWE banner could be this good.

Hold onto your Trish Stratus/Lita battles; they were indeed good, but it’s my opinion that their matches fall considerably short to what Charlotte and Natalya did on May 29. I had no idea Charlotte could have such a performance in her. Unfairly, I had written her off as just another legacy act, like Wes Brisco or Dakota Darsow or whoever, hired by a company whose only ideas for pushing said act involves gushing about their father’s legendary credentials (this is known as The Tamina Snuka Principle).

With Charlotte and Natalya putting forth such a heated battle, as though winning the NXT Women’s gold meant more to them than anything on the planet, it’s impossible not to watch that match and be more than impressed.

It’s reign as the best women’s match in WWE history was dealt a crushing blow on Wednesday night, when Charlotte dropped the strap in a fatal-four-way to former partner Sasha Banks, the match also including the precocious Bayley and unretired Irish starlet Becky Lynch.

In the eyes of the most ardent know-it-all fan, the women’s four way occupied the same space as an enthralling can-you-top-this battle between the former Prince Devitt and PAC, and a delightfully-brutal main event that wrote a new chapter in the Kevin Steen/El Generico rivalry. That women’s four way rivaled, and in some cases exceeded, both of those matches in gut-instinct star ratings doled out by enthralled fans (I went ****1/4 for Finn Balor/Adrian Neville, **** for the four-way, and ****1/2 for Kevin Owens/Sami Zayn, but it’s damn close).

Charlotte’s in-ring acumen had a tough act to follow in Paige, whose masterful performances at such a young age buoyed a 300-day Women’s Title reign, a portfolio of work that led to her receiving a thunderous pop from the day-after-WrestleMania crowd when she’d arrived to occupy the ring with AJ Lee. By all accounts, Charlotte will be headed to the main roster soon, where she’ll likely trade harder on her father’s name, per the usual anemic creative oozing from between Vince McMahon’s ears.

New champion Banks looked to be a relatively one-note act palling around with Charlotte and Summer Rae at different points as “The BFFs” before ramping up into a conceited-bitch act, calling herself, “The Boss”. Any notions that Banks was more fluff than fire went out the window at NXT: R Evolution in December, following a thoroughly good performance with Charlotte for the title. The match was somewhat lost among Sami Zayn’s NXT Title win, Kevin Owens’ debut (and eventual beatdown of Zayn), and Finn Balor’s body-paint special, but those that watched Banks quite literally saw an evolution of her ring work. Her getting to pin Charlotte on Wednesday has more than enough merit – she can carry the division as a snotty heel for quite some time, with the lovable Bayley, current ally Lynch, and the spunky Carmella as prospective rivals.

I’d like to throw a name into the hat for another possible opponent.

If Charlotte’s getting the call-up, one woman who could certainly fill the void (you’ve already read the header of the article, so you can connect the dots) would be Sara Del Rey.

Yes, the same Sara Del Rey who currently puts these NXT women through master class after master class to sand the edges off their frames prior to their in-ring spectacles. For over two years, the real-life Sara Amato has fine-tuned all of the women you see performing at Full Sail University, doing more for women’s wrestling and the advancement of the gender in the sport at large off-camera than some of the trade-show models on Raw do on-camera.

I throw Del Rey’s name into the hat and I’m not alone; ask any fan that’s watched her perform in Ring of Honor or Shimmer or wherever. In the pantheon of Best Women’s Wrestlers of the Last Ten Years, it’s a crowded class. Names like Awesome Kong, Cheerleader Melissa, Gail Kim, Paige, and others will invariably make the list, but Del Rey occupies the same space. Anyone trained by Daniel Bryan and worth teaming with Chris Hero and Claudio “Cesaro” Castagnoli boasts one hell of a wrestling pedigree.

Yet, all she does for WWE is train others, and that’s a bit bittersweet for her fans. Del Rey doesn’t have the lithe model’s body or the high cheekbones that Kevin Dunn covets, but that’s not relevant in NXT. Last I checked, the new men’s champion is a bit blubbery with a cauliflower nose and little muscle definition. Doesn’t stop him from being bought as a human wrecking machine, does it?

NXT has become a top-flight independent with WWE production values (I’ve nicknamed it, “Ring of Hunter”). If the hefty Kevin Steen, undersized Kenta, and others can make it based solely on their outsize skills as performers, so can Sara Del Rey (who, I’ll add, is nowhere near a trainwreck in the looks department).

Del Rey vs. any of the women currently in NXT, plus the in-limbo Charlotte, or even a visiting Natalya or Paige, definitely get my attention. I’d just as soon watch Del Rey vs. Paige as I would the next chapter of Owens vs. Zayn, or another Balor/Neville epic.

NXT has done so much to revitalize the decaying embers of wrestling fandom, providing a spark of fun and energy days after Raw unimaginatively slogs to the three-hour finish line, that I believe it’s a strong possibility we’ll see Del Rey on camera sooner rather than later. It’s a career victory lap of sorts for a wrestler worthy of the spotlight.

If Raw is the death march into oblivion, NXT can boast the Death Rey as just another coup for wrestling’s greatest weekly show.

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Kevin Owens Is Money

February 12, 2015 By: Category: WWE | Pro Wrestling

Someone noted on Twitter Wednesday night that Kevin Owens is a good composite of the qualities that Mick Foley and CM Punk brought to the table. Like Foley and Punk, he doesn’t have the appearance of a wrestling megastar, that over-inflated musculature, that adorns your kid’s lunchbox. The mere appearance of Owens betrays the flawed idea that a wrestler should turn heads at the airport. To a non-fan, Owens might look like that one fraternity brother that could drink around 80 beers before staggering into the girl’s dorm and puking in a clothes hamper. And we all know that guy, don’t we?

But who cares? Who cares what a wrestler looks like when he’s so utterly convincing at everything he does? Foley’s blood-chilling monologues and blood-spilling ring work put him many cuts above the average wrestler. Punk’s matter-of-fact, well-spoken disdain for the world made him a must-see misanthrope, and his grueling work in the ring reinforced how unique he truly was as a wrestler.

There was a time when WWE would have likely passed on signing Owens, based on his billowing physique more than anything else (just as WWE may have with Foley had Jim Ross not gone to bat for him). Back in the era of John Laurinaitis making hires, it seemed as though every call-up was tall enough play small forward in the NBA. Sheamus, Alberto Del Rio, Drew McIntyre, Wade Barrett, Mason Ryan, and forgotten stiffs like Eli Cottonwood and Jackson Andrews decimated the height chart, but a few (particularly the last three) didn’t measure up with any conviction.

When Triple H began populating his NXT with tried-and-true independent and international talent, the former Kevin Steen was a natural hire. His punishing work in Ring of Honor and elsewhere aside, Owens is more than just a Vader-like brawler with convincing strikes and an offense that keeps chiropractors’ schedules full. He’s also a gifted actor, able to captivate with displays of menace, frustration, shock, straightforwardness, diabolical intent, and even slight vulnerability with subtle twists of the dial. When you get past the Package Piledrivers that look about as safe as a Slip-n-Slide over a bed of nails, Owens puts most wrestlers to shame in the subtlety department.

There’s a striking irony in that, that a wrestler who routinely finds his name in the running for fan-chosen Best Brawler awards annually could master the little nuances that make a good wrestler a great one. If you’ve followed him in his NXT run, you’ve probably enjoyed the story between he and Sami Zayn, former friend/enemy El Generico in ROH (and if you followed *that* story, you REALLY enjoyed it).

In a story far too complex to be housed on Monday Night Raw, Owens assaulted Zayn after celebrating his NXT Championship win with him in December, despite the fact that Owens had only debuted less than two hours earlier. Owens was portrayed not as a one-note monster, but as someone that still respected long-time travel partner Zayn, indicating the attack was little more than a professional statement: Owens has a family to feed, and wants the money to go along with being champion. Rather than outright heel it up, Owens walked a tightrope between “I do what I have to do” lunch-bucket hero and dangerously violent fiend, adhering to a personal code of ethics that clash with the happiness of others not in his shoes.

In promos leading up to the February 11 showdown, Owens reinforced his points without resorting to put-on yelling or phony, mischievous laughter. There were no corny utterances of a tacked-on catchphrase. Owens maintained his “it’s just business” goading, casting a slight aura of whimsical negligence; he didn’t take glee in powerbombing Zayn against the apron, but he didn’t feel terrible either. Zayn, himself no slouch in the acting department, answered Owens’ indifference with an intentionally-forced display of verbal heart, a mild-mannered champion promising to kick Owens’ ass. After taking the powerbomb into the side of the ring, Zayn had to convince himself that he could turn back the calmly-callous goon.

The match itself was tasked with keeping a great-match streak alive, following a Finn Balor-Adrian Neville epic and a four-way Women’s Title bout that puts anything the Bella Twins do to shame. The match took on the qualities of a Sting-Vader match from 20 years ago, Steen pummeling Zayn into the ground recklessly, at times effortlessly. The head-game was a nice touch, since Owens is just as dangerous psychologically, and his reminder to Zayn of who the natural aggressor was served to lay the foundation for a deliberately-slow build to the match.

As the match reached a fever pitch, the twist came to the story: Zayn whacked his head on the entrance ramp after a quebrada, and Owens went into overdrive. A pop-up powerbomb couldn’t finish, despite Zayn showing signs of a head injury. Two more against the referee’s wishes couldn’t finish either, but Zayn wasn’t exactly kicking out with authority. Owens then does what comes naturally to someone of his moral stock, dragging his old friend off the mat and landing two more skull-rattling powerbombs before the match is stopped. Even fans chanting “FIGHT OWENS FIGHT” in the early going were silenced at the uncomfortable direction the match had taken.

Owens’ unvarnished jubilation in victory culminated two months of how to build an effective wrestler, with enough nuance to satisfy the smarter audience, and more than enough caustic boom to please the Michael Bay end of the fan spectrum.

There will be those who ask, “Why can’t WWE do this with Roman Reigns? Why can’t they give him a character like this, and a story like this, to work with?” I would counter by noting how much Owens brings to the table, after a decade and a half of honing his skills. There aren’t many wrestlers, pushed or not, that can blend these traits into one hefty package, but Owens does, making it look all too easy in the process.

The new Foley? The new Punk? Kevin Owens is more than worthy of his own pedestal, with well-earned days of glory ahead.

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Has WWE NXT Overtaken Raw and SmackDown?

December 17, 2014 By: Category: WWE | Pro Wrestling

WWE fans are buzzing after NXT’s REvolution event that occurred on Thursday, December 11. The night was filled with some very solid wrestling, top notch entertainment and overall was an impressively strong card.

Of course, the majority of us expected it to be. NXT has been red hot as of late, especially since the advent of the WWE Network. One week after another brings more excitement and more fun to a company that often finds itself struggling to deliver on both. But the question is has NXT overtaken WWE?

I have to say, I never thought I would be asking this question right now. Don’t get me wrong, it has nothing to do with the quality of the NXT product. WWE’s developmental territory has been getting it done and then some for quite a while now.

And it’s not because I didn’t think it could ever reach this point. Each new week seems to always top the previous one and in an environment where virtually all of the talent is striving to improve, it’s inevitable that very thing would happen. Eventually the product would reach the level that it has and we would all be left having this very debate.

So yes, I did think it was entirely possible. But let’s just say I didn’t think WWE would allow it to get this far. I never thought that the company would intentionally hold the NXT talent down, however. We’ve seen that before over the years, more times than any of us care to admit.

I guess what surprises me the most is that the main roster is not better right now. WWE has allowed its developmental brand, the one that features Superstars that are supposedly not ready for prime time, to completely show up its primary locker room. NXT is supposed the be the proving ground, the place where new faces are sent to hone their skills and build their characters in front of a WWE audience that may or may not have any previous knowledge of who they are.

But instead, NXT is now a parade of main event stars. These guys don’t need time to adapt. Building confidence is not necessary, theirs is at an all time high. The NXT roster looks more than ready to be transplanted straight to Monday Night Raw. Like scab players that just want a job, the NXT team would be a welcome change to the major league roster rife with overpaid athletes. Think Necessary Roughness, only these guys are much better actors that Keanu Reeves.

Of course, that is an oversimplification of the whole situation. The fact is that a good number of the NXT stars are not replacement players; they’re ready and they’re ready right now. There’s a lot of great talent in Florida and that talent only really needs a stage to perform on. Once they get it, they kill it. That’s what professionals do.

Kevin Owens debuted on REvolution, in one of the most highly anticipated matches in recent memory. The wrestler formerly known as Kevin Steen did what he does best; he steamrolled his opponent. CJ Parker was Owens’ first victim and he will not be the last. I have to say that I didn’t know how Owens would look on WWE programming or if he would even fit in. And the fact is he didn’t; he stood out. Keep your eyes on Owens, everyone else will be.

Charlotte retained her NXT Women’s Championship against Sasha Banks, who was not even on my radar at all. Well, she is now. For any Diva on the main roster that’s interested in how a match should be run, there can be no better example than this one. Both women turned in very solid performances and that belt could not be in better hands right now. Charlotte is the real deal.

If not for the NXT Championship match, Hideo Itami and Finn Balor versus The Ascension would have been the main event. The reason for that is Balor, who finally brought the paint to TV. Looking more like a Spider-Man symbiote than a pro wrestler, Balor crawled down the ramp and changed NXT forever. This guy was made for WWE and if all goes well, he should make some serious money for them and for himself.

Then there’s the aforementioned main event, Adrian Neville versus Sami Zayn. You know how the word “clinic” is so cliché and so overused? Well, this was a clinic. This was what a professional wrestling match is supposed to be and how it’s supposed to look. Fans loved every minute of it because unlike some of their Raw counterparts, Zayn and Neville were allowed to tell their story in the ring without having to suffer some ridiculous run-in or otherwise weak ending.

The future is now. How’s that for cliché? But in this case, it’s the absolute truth. So now that we’ve established the NXT crew is primed and ready for the big time, the only issue is when will it happen and why is Florida still a developmental territory? Isn’t NXT basically the third WWE brand now? And shouldn’t it be?

Again, how did WWE let this happen? How is the main roster so full of nonsense that the supposed C show is running A+ right now? NXT looks more like what WWE should be, while Raw and even SmackDown have both basically become old hat. NXT is called the future but shouldn’t it be the norm?

Now here’s a bit of news that no one really wants to think about. Just because the NXT program is money right now does not necessarily mean that its talent can get over on Monday nights. Call it an overall unfamiliarity with the product, call it a blasé attitude among the audience, call it what you will. The fact is that the NXT crowd and the typical WWE crowd are not always one and the same.

But maybe it will be. And maybe it needs to happen sooner rather than later. NXT is taking over, if it hasn’t already.

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Flashback: Steen vs. Generico Feud ends at ROH Final Battle 2010

December 12, 2014 By: Category: WWE | Pro Wrestling

Editor’s Note: In light of the recent Kevin Owens vs. Sami Zayn angle in WWE NXT, the CCB is re-publishing a blog from 2010 documenting their classic rivalry from Ring of Honor. This blog was originally published on December 9, 2010.

It has literally been one year in the making. At ROH Final Battle 2010 it all comes to an end in the same place it started, the Manhattan Center in New York City. It has been the best wrestling feud in all of 2010 and if you don’t believe me go back to watch it all for yourself. The feud I am talking about is Kevin Steen vs. El Generico.

I had the pleasure of attending my first Ring of Honor event one year ago in the Manhattan Center in New York City when the feud between Kevin Steen & El Generico actually began. It was there where we saw the one-time best friends, tag team partners and former Tag Team Champions split apart from one another. Steen turned his back on Generico and in the process became one of the most insane characters in wrestling for quite sometime.

It was similar in ways to a feud that really grabbed people’s attention in the late-90s between Sabu and Taz. The similarity came in the sense that while Taz & Sabu never touched for an entire year, it was a period of time where El Generico did not touch or lay a hand on Kevin Steen. El Generico was confused & heartbroken that Kevin Steen had turned his back on him after all this time, while Steen made sure to take every opportunity to lay a hand on El Generico.

There would be stare downs in the ring between El Generico and Kevin Steen where the fans wanted to see El Generico retaliate. Already in the early stages of the feud people would realize that these two very underrated wrestlers could hold the crowd in the palm of their hands. The fans could see El Generico battle with himself over wanting to strike Steen while “Mr. Wrestling” would provoke his one time friend.

Fans would finally see El Generico snap almost 5 months later in April of 2010 at the ROH Big Bang show. It was there, where once again, another city, another place, that the fans wanted El Generico to strike Kevin Steen. Fans would get their wish as Generico would finally snap and send this feud from the 4th gear it was already in, into a 5th & 6th gears.

During this entire feud it was able to take other wrestlers, veterans even, such as Steve Corino (who would side with Kevin Steen) and Colt Cabana (who would side with El Generico), to make it fresh and fun to watch. Fans still wanted more, even though it was Colt Cabana in the ring with Kevin Steen, or El Generico in the ring with Steve Corino, the fans were hooked. They knew that while it wasn’t Steen/Generico, it was the work of art being displayed through this storyline.

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It would finally come ahead at the Death before Dishonor show from June of this year. The match was billed as “six months in the making” and would be the first time the two would battle it out in the ring. The feud was so intense that it was El Generico who interrupted the first match of the show to get Steen out in the ring for that very moment to be the opening match. The hatred that was built between these two in the squared circle has been something we haven’t seen in quite sometime.

The match was great and had the fans in the palms of their hands. The emotion was there; the crowd was into it and loved every moment Steen & Generico wrestled. It was two underrated wrestlers attempting to steal the show based off of their great in-ring work, mic skills and grabbing the crowd’s emotion & placing it in the middle of the ring.

While Steen would come out on top that night, the match would be moved to its next chapter and most definitely its darkest chapter, at New York City at the Glory by Honor IX show in September. Once again I had the honor of being at the show and witnessing the emotion in the building that night. It was most arguably the most anticipating match on the entire card, a chain match that would come on just before intermission.

It would be a tag team chain match with El Generico & Colt Cabana taking on Kevin Steen & Steve Corino. Once again the veteran secondary wrestlers were involved in the match and that didn’t matter, the fans were hooked. There was brutality, violence and the word you keep hearing throughout this entire blog, emotion involved.

Generico & Cabana would come out on top after a very good match and it would turn into the next chapter of this entire feud. As Generico was placing Steen on the top rope for his trademark brainbuster, it was at this time Steen would unmask El Generico in front of the crowd, for a glimpse Generico’s face was shown before being quickly covered up. It was at this point the great feud became darker after this very match and moment.

With El Generico now unmasked and having to use a secondary mask, one that was completely black, made this once loveable character a monster that no one thought would happen when this feud started. Generico & Steen were able to complete 360 their in-ring characters and make them from once loveable people to the darkest of character’s wrestling has seen in sometime. It was where this feud was also sadly seeing its final stretch run.

On ROH on HDNet it would be Kevin Steen creating a final match, one to settle the score, at Final Battle 2010 in New York City. It would be Steen vs. Generico with stipulations that would change the face of ROH in 2011. If Steen won it would have to be El Generico who would have to unmask in front of the crowd, if El Generico won it would make Kevin Steen leave Ring of Honor. It is now a make or break match; one that is becoming the favorite match everyone wants to see on December 18th in NYC.

We are days away from seeing one of the best feuds, if not the best feud in Wrestling for 2010 come to an end. When people look back at Kevin Steen & El Generico’s careers it will be this feud that defines them. They have made themselves some of the top Independent wrestlers in the business based on all the intangibles wrestlers need to be top stars. In-ring work, promo skills and making the crowd feel your emotion.

It’s sad to know that on December 18th this feud will come to an end because it has been one of the most entertaining feuds we have seen in quite sometime. For an entire 365 day span, Kevin Steen and El Generico have perfected the art of a wrestling feud. If you haven’t checked out this feud yet then do yourself a favor and start getting the DVD’s from the last year for Ring of Honor wrestling because these two wrestlers have made wrestling very fun for any fan feeling letdown by the WWE or TNA.

Congrats to Kevin Steen & El Generico on perfecting the art of a wrestling feud. I hate to see it end but it will end with probably the most emotional match/angle that these two of done the past year and they have done some pretty audience grabbing stuff. This has been the best wrestling feud in the past year and if you don’t believe me then just check it out, it will be worth every penny you spend.

At Final Battle 2010, we will see the war come to an end.

What do you think of the Kevin Steen/El Generico feud? Tell us your thoughts on “The Still Real to Us Show” by e-mailing us over at [email protected] and give us your thoughts on whether you agree with more or not! Then go ahead and download the show this Thursday @ 8pm ET/5pm PT at www.wheelhouseradio.com or www.wrestlechat.net to find out if your pick made it to the air!

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WWE NXT Is Better Than Monday Night RAW

September 15, 2014 By: Category: WWE | Pro Wrestling

Last Thursday marked the third event streamed live on the WWE Network for the company’s developmental federation, NXT.

And for the third consecutive live streaming event, NXT proved that it is worlds better than the product the WWE puts out.

Before I go into just why NXT is significantly better than the product the WWE puts out for its main show, Raw, I will make a defensible point for Raw. NXT gets to appeal to the more hardcore fans, the type of crowd that would show up to an Indie federation in a bingo hall to cheer on guys that your average fan has never heard of. Raw, meanwhile, is trying to appeal to the common denominator. They’re trying to appeal to the fans that casually watch Raw, hoping to get them or their kid into it enough that they’ll buy the merchandise, tickets and the Network.

Sadly, that the problem with reaching to the common denominator means that you have to dumb things down. The casual fan wants instant gratification, something to chant along with and easily recognizable stories without twists, turns or nuances that make them interesting.

As NXT showed last night, they do everything that fans like me clamor for out of the flagship show. The show is built around wrestling; performers may jabber at one another or get into backstage antics, but it all progresses to solving things in the ring. With Raw, it seems as though the in-ring stuff gets in the way of things they want to do on the microphone or backstage.

NXT also puts value in all of their titles, not just whichever one they happen to be paying attention to that day. There is gravity and importance to each title in their own different ways. On Raw, the WWE World Heavyweight Championship seems to be the only one that really gets any hype or attention. It comes in fits and spurts for the Divas and Intercontinental championships; not at all for the tag team titles. Really, you can see when the WWE gives a crap about which title because they alternate between hyping up their other titles and totally ignoring them.

Most importantly, the characters in NXT have realistic motivations and follow up on them. Tyler Breeze thinks he’s the best looking person in the company and wants the face of NXT (its champion) to be beautiful. Tyson Kidd is a 10-year WWE veteran who doesn’t have much going for him other than being “Nattie’s husband”, so he needs the NXT Championship to feel valuable again. Even the undercard stories get this kind of love. Bayley, challenger for the Women’s Championship and living the gimmick of “wrestling mark”, goes from being treated as a joke to having to be considered as a serious contender, earning the respect of the much bigger Charlotte Flair, who comes with all the fanfare that goes with being a Flair.

On Raw, there’s little of this. There’s little in the way of progressing the story in a meaningful manner. Look at the Brock Lesnar/John Cena feud. Instead of following Cena’s destruction at Summerslam with months of Cena questioning himself before eventually triumphing as the hero he’s treated as, he immediately comes back as the destroyer. He lays waste to everyone, says definitively that he’s going to kick Lesnar’s ass and basically went back to status quo. They quickly drop storylines, pushes and things that happened just a week before in favor of doing something else. NXT has maintained intertwining stories between multiple characters spanning months.

Speaking of those suddenly deflated pushes, NXT stays the course with guys, giving them chances to build and grow as characters. Would CJ Parker have been able to find his snarky hippy persona on Raw? No, he’d have been put into squash matches and been effectively killed as a character if he didn’t get over immediately. Think of how many promising characters – Damien Sandow, Cody Rhodes, Bo Dallas – have had their momentum totally derailed by the ADD-booking that WWE displays. What would things be like for The Shield if they hadn’t had the instant impact they enjoyed right out of the gate?

The future does look bright for the WWE if they can take these nurtured, cared-for characters and implement them onto the big stage. But if they continue with their current trend of booking and character pushes, things can only end one way.

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WWE’s Ten Best Matches Of The First Half Of 2014

July 10, 2014 By: Category: lists, WWE | Pro Wrestling

Through questionable booking, a stock market crash, fan discontent, and the unfortunate loss of JTG, WWE has provided audiences with, if nothing else, a lot of great in-ring action. Here are my personal picks for the ten best bouts so far in 2014.

10. Randy Orton vs. Daniel Bryan vs. John Cena vs. Cesaro vs. Christian vs. Sheamus (WWE Elimination Chamber, February 23)

As long as the performers cut a watchable pace in the epic-length Chamber matches, and there’s some creative mayhem taking place between the chain-link walls, it generally adds up to a great match. This was no exception, and it even came with some added drama: would Bryan avenge his exclusion from the Royal Rumble match and become WWE Champion? A spurned Twitterverse, led by a bat-wielding Mick Foley, glued their eyes to the action.

Bryan, of course, didn’t win here, succumbing to Corporate Kane (RepubliKane?) in a screwy finish. Cena also didn’t win, as a Wyatt Family teleportation cost him Orton’s gold as well. It was Bryan’s portion of the story that received the most focus, with him taking a beating (being whipped through an empty pod by Cesaro), and valiantly clawing his way back before the heart-ripping finish. That only made the WrestleMania payoff more enjoyable.

9. Charlotte vs. Natalya (NXT Takeover, May 29)

This was certainly surprising. You’d expect a good match from Natalya under required circumstances (read: a match of reasonable length where she’s not selling for the trade show model du jour). But Charlotte? She never really impressed me in NXT, and it seemed her push was based on that she was tall, blonde, and the offspring of wrestling royalty. To say this match was incredible might be the understatement of all of 2014.

In a match to determine the new NXT Women’s Champion, Charlotte held her own in what ended up a highly intense match-up, most notable for the Sharpshooter/figure-four spot with determined reversals and realistic selling. Perhaps having Ric Flair and Bret Hart at ringside was a heaven-sent dual muse? Charlotte capped off the match with the win, which many predicted, but the story in getting to that point was something no one saw coming.

8. Daniel Bryan vs. Bray Wyatt (WWE Royal Rumble, January 26)

Forget the aftermath of the night, which consisted of two hours of fan anger the likes of which hadn’t been seen since the 1991 Great American Bash. Contained within its frame of time, Bryan and Wyatt held their own in a match that essentially saved the Rumble from being one of the absolute worst PPVs of all time. Even with the match, the night retains its unfathomable infamy, but at least you can say, “Well, one match was awesome.”

Bryan and Wyatt’s match opened the Rumble, and was pretty oddly structured for an era bent on mechanical pacing. Bryan worked Wyatt’s legs early with a series of kicks, and the match didn’t really hit the WWE Main Event Style until well into the proceedings. That was for the better, because different can be highly enjoyable. The finish was memorable, with Wyatt catching a Bryan dive into Sister Abigail against the crowd barrier, very suitably slick.

7. Tyler Breeze vs. Sami Zayn (NXT Takeover, May 29)

Takeover’s a serious contender for the best WWE show of 2014. The women’s match makes this list, and the NXT Championship bout between Adrian Neville and Tyson Kidd was a viable list candidate that just fell short. Breeze and Zayn’s number one contender match was the best of a well-executed card, hardly surprising given Zayn’s general Midas touch. However, the match served as Breeze’s coming-out party, making him one to watch.

Making anyone this generation’s Shawn Michaels is a risky proposition, equal to calling any NBA player “the next Jordan”, but WWE’s all in with making Breeze the risk-taking pretty boy incarnate of today. He was game on exchanging crazy moves with the experienced Zayn, including a weird reversal sequence that ended in an improvised powerbomb. The ending was also a creative bit of screwiness, involving a questionably-blatant low blow.

6. Cesaro vs. Sami Zayn (NXT Arrival, February 27)

Nothing better than a feud over who is simply “the better man.” Strange concept to some in power, but for my simple eyes, the Zayn/Cesaro rivalry was some of the most enjoyable wrestling over the past several years. After a two-out-of-three falls match that Cesaro won in August (hailed by many as the 2013’s best match), the story was Zayn was bent on avenging the loss, and challenged Cesaro to a final battle at WWE Network’s first major special.

The cat-and-mouse nature of the match, with Zayn’s eager risk-taking and Cesaro’s defiant power response, built feverishly to Cesaro gaining the definitive upper hand, and Zayn looking the beaten man. Cesaro even begged Zayn to stop kicking out, but Zayn countered the Neutralize. That led to Cesaro brutalizing him with Swiss Death, a discus uppercut, and the punctuating Neutralizer. Afterward, Cesaro gave Zayn the gesture of respect he’d wanted.

5. Randy Orton vs. Batista vs. Daniel Bryan (WWE WrestleMania XXX, April 6)

Nostalgia always feels best when its employment seems natural. There was no shoehorning of classic Attitude Era elements into the WrestleMania main event, which saw the use of a crooked ref, even more crooked authority figures, and a teased stretcher job for Bryan that turned into a Willis Reed comeback special. Add to it the legitimate want of the audience to see Bryan prevail, and the elements were there for a tremendous ‘Mania finale.

It took a lot to get the crowd back into it after The Undertaker’s streak was startlingly ended less than an hour earlier by Brock Lesnar, but all three performers held their own, even the maligned Batista. The bomb/neckbreaker combo on Bryan through the table was memorably sick, and Bryan’s forcing of Batista to submit erupted the Superdome appropriately. If this were the Newlywed Game, WWE held up cards that had every fan answer correct in this one.

4. The Shield vs. Evolution (WWE Extreme Rules, May 4)

The Shield coming to Bryan’s rescue the night after WrestleMania kicked off a highly enjoyable run against the reformed Evolution (until Rollins was swiftly turned, apparently in response to low Memorial Day ratings if you believe the sheets). A rematch at the June 1 Payback event, under elimination and ‘no DQ’ rules, was pretty great in its own right, but the original from Extreme Rules remains the superior exhibition, with its faster pace and livelier crowd.

Rollins continued his campaign to become the modern WWE generation’s Jeff Hardy, doing so by leaping off of the upper deck at the IZOD Center onto Triple H, Randy Orton, and a sacrificial Dean Ambrose. Say what you will about Batista, but he’s been a good sport since the poorly-received comeback, putting over Roman Reigns clean as a sheet by eating the Superman punch, and the emphatic spear. WWE has issues creating stars, but got the Shield 100% correct.

3. John Cena vs. Cesaro (WWE Monday Night Raw, February 17)

If you’re given twenty minutes on free television to work with John Cena, and you’re still kicking around the midcard or upper midcard with little in the way of promising direction, chances are this is your litmus test. WWE seemed to be flirting with a true push of Cesaro in the preceding weeks, sticking him into the Elimination Chamber match, and even put him over champion Randy Orton in a non-title bout. So far so good, but the real test was at hand.

The win over Orton raised the possibility that he *could* beat Cena, instead of having it be the obvious “LOL CENA WINS” trope, and Cesaro held up his end. The most notable spot was the deadlift superplex, now a Cesaro staple, which was used on the B-shows before its unleashing on Raw. Cesaro did end up losing clean to Cena, but everyone had to be encouraged by what they saw, especially when the crowd went crazy for the Cesaro Swing attempts.

2. The Shield vs. The Wyatt Family (WWE Elimination Chamber, February 23)

Pretty good sign when the fans are chanting “THIS IS AWESOME” before any of the six have even made contact with one another. Then again, it raises the bar pretty high for a group of men, none of whom have been truly juiced-in main eventers yet, that are being counted on to deliver in a prime spot. It was hailed as a match-of-the-year candidate before it even ended (and indeed while it was still going), and remains in the running four months later.

The Shield weren’t particularly babyfaces in the run-up to the match, aside from not backing down in face-to-face confrontations, but the trio took to the good guys formula with the sort of timing and pacing that made it seem like they’d been faces for years. The chaotic end-run of the match, which was a star-maker for the kamikaze Rollins, puts it above most other spotfests by having logic and organization behind each stunt. The Wyatts won, but really, so did the Shield.

1. Daniel Bryan vs. Triple H (WWE WrestleMania XXX, April 6)

After “The Game” made Brock Lesnar slow down to his pace for a trio of matches, and needed Shawn Michaels to play rodeo clown in the overrated “End of an Era” match, I went into his match with Bryan with lowered expectations. I’d figured Bryan would have to slow down to allow his 44-year-old boss with two bum legs to keep up. Lo and behold, the Fountain of Youth resides in New Orleans, as Triple H had his greatest match in probably a good decade or so.

As if he was determined to prove he could still go with the best, and maybe feeling slighted that CM Punk brushed off a match with him, Helmsley wrestled a beaut with the best technician in the company, mixing pure wrestling with the sports-entertainment transition spots you’d expect out of his matches. In the end, Triple H put Bryan over 100% cleanly, and allowed him to kick out of the Pedigree in the process. And we all though Hunter didn’t know how to elevate.

Justin Henry has been an occasional contributor to Camel Clutch Blog since 2009. His other work can be found at WrestleCrap.com and ColdHardFootballFacts.com. He can be found on Twitter, so give him a follow.

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The Vaudevillains Reveal the Relationship Between WWE and Its Fans

June 26, 2014 By: Category: WWE | Pro Wrestling

The Vaudevillains; what more can be said about Aiden English and Simon Gotch’s dual moniker? If you don’t watch NXT, you’re missing something else: English parlays his operatic Broadway gimmick into a tandem with Gotch, a turn-of-the-century strongman with an exaggerated boxing stance and Snidely Whiplash-mustache.

Making their entrance to lively piano music through a black-and-white lens, configured with old-timey film quality, the Vaudevillains are an instant sensation. Already, the hip-to-the-room NXT crowd at Full Sail has taken to chanting “PUT YOUR DUKES UP” at the manic Gotch, who looks like he should be conspiring to fix matches with Ad Santel and Joe Stecher.

In 2014, a wrestling crowd that increasingly appreciates in-jokes, outlandish unreality, and full-blown absurdity takes to the Vaudevillains like Deadheads to a Jerry Garcia resurrection. Admittedly, it’s hard not to be charmed by the duo: any wrestlers who perform unrealistically with the gusto and enthusiasm that English and Gotch display are going to be appreciated.

It doesn’t seem that it was always this way. Transplant the Vaudevillains to 1991 or 1997 or 2003, and it’s a little harder imagining them getting over. Seems though appreciating blatant absurdity in wrestling is a modern notion.

In 1991 alone, future WrestleCrap inductions Repo Man, Skinner, Arachnaman, and Big Josh ambled onto the scene, with none making any real impact outside of Repo Man as a consistent mid-card act. Nowadays, Repo Man would be an ironic hero, getting cheers from the CHIKARA-loving portion of the audience for stealing possessions from other midcarders. His Coliseum Video vignette from over twenty years ago, which entailed stealing Bill Alfonso’s car, is over-the-top hilarious in hindsight, but it didn’t resonate with viewers of the time. Same with Big Josh: nobody cared in 1991, but you could picture fans, especially the NXT diehards, chanting “DAN-CING BEARS” at him today.

In other words, for as much as my WrestleCrap compadre RD Reynolds shares my merriment of the Vaudevillains, in another time, they may have been written off as ‘Crap’, just like Repo Man was.

To use another example, it’s also hard to imagine (at least for me, anyway) Jay Lethal’s “Black Machismo” character getting over in the pre-internet-saturation age, no matter how well Lethal nailed every facet of the Randy Savage character. In the Attitude Era, I would wager he’d be used as a colorful novelty act, much in the same way The Hurricane was employed in 2002-03; a few wins here and there and plenty of airtime, but no rocket push.

What changed?

For one thing, I think there’s far more backlash against the modern main event than there was in previous eras. It’s not even that John Cena and Randy Orton are a decade into their relentless run at the top, while fellow lifer Triple H is involved heavily. It’s that the storylines follow the same patterns, the characters virtually recite the same promos, regular viewers watch as the characters they follow week to week sometimes contradict themselves verbally, and all in all, nothing feels fresh. Compared to the wrestling of our more formative years, WWE feels like it’s stuck on loop more than ever.

When this happens, something totally zany and off-the-wall, like two 1920s throwbacks, becomes a major talking point. It’s an oasis on WWE’s tedious plane of existence. That’s why bored fans created the Fandango’ing craze; different without the guarantee of payoff becomes preferable to year whatever of the status quo.

Making matters worse is that the main event, and every ‘top story’ the company peddles, are magnified beyond comprehension. A three-hour Raw (a show that really has no business being three hours from a quality standpoint) barely features half the roster, if they even showcase half at all. Longer matches have a hand in it (I’d argue that no match on Raw needs to be longer than ten minutes, save for the main event), while the mid-card gasps for air like they’ve just been shipwrecked.

That’s why when 3MB comes along in 2012, there was a tinge of ironic excitement from the more immersed fans. Heath Slater, Drew McIntyre, and Jinder Mahal had been shuffling along, doing little of note, until they became the world’s lamest air-guitar band. Hey, it was *something*, right? And yeah, they lost 97% of their matches since, and the joke dragged on long enough that 3MB might be a WrestleCrap induction unto itself, but for a brief moment, it felt like three men among the creatively-unfulfilled had a purpose. Purpose is exciting.

Turning it around for a moment, I realize that my generation of fans is the one still watching with great regularity into our late 20s, clear into our 30s and even 40s, and we’ve exposed ourselves to a lot of wrestling. Like, a LOT of wrestling. Inevitably, we compare the modern product to what we remember and like best, and if it doesn’t match up, we thumb our noses at it immediately. A rose-colored past will always trump the uncertain present. It’s because met high-expectations from the past become the standard benchmark going forward.

With so many hours of wrestling on TV each week, plus YouTube, plus The WWE Network, plus a deluge of websites and social media with breaking ‘newz’ and meaningless speculation (yes, I realize I’m part of the ‘problem’), we oversaturate our own enthusiasm while WWE oversaturates its own product.

And yes, we all still watch, despite our constant claims of how bad wrestling has gotten. Gluttons, we are.

Between the company playing slow-pitch softball with their upper-card booking, and the jaded fan with a discriminating palette and too much sense of history, it’s almost no wonder that we praise the Vaudevillains instead of making quizzical eyes. That’s not to take anything away from English or Gotch; they’re playing the hell out of a silly idea to the point where you want to believe in it.

Perhaps it’s because the fans are increasingly feeling they have nothing to believe in.

At WWE events, fans still chant for a man that happily walked into the retirement sector five months ago. At indy events featuring men all-too-recently TNA talents, the crowd voices obscene remarks about their ex-employer (see: House of Hardcore’s recent tour). Events meant to be enjoyed for the product at hand become sounding boards to have a go at the executives and suits believed responsible for mutilating the show that diehard fans grew up with.

As an act of resistance, the unreality of two century-old showmen existing in 2014 becomes the accepted reality, as the receptors reject the centerpiece that’s collected dust in perpetuity, the unwanted eyesore.

Never before has the phrase ‘only in wrestling’ been so perfect in its application.

Justin Henry has been an occasional contributor to Camel Clutch Blog since 2009. His other work can be found at WrestleCrap.com and ColdHardFootballFacts.com. He can be found on Twitter, so give him a follow.

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Triple H WWE NXT Media Call Highlights

May 29, 2014 By: Category: WWE | Pro Wrestling

C.O.O. Triple H hosted a media conference call on Wednesday to promote Thursday’s WWE NXT special on the WWE Network. The call was dominated by wrestling media who were able to pull some interesting nuggets out of the Game.

This was a real interesting media call as it featured questions entirely from pro wrestling media. My hunch is that when the WWE schedules these calls, they are looking for mainstream media attention. That may be bad news for them but it was certainly good news if you follow the “dirt sheets.”

Here are just a couple of highlights from Triple H’s media call…

– NXT will have a bigger presence on the WWE Network as the Network grows. What that entails I am not quite sure. They could also have a bigger presence next year at WrestleMania.

– If it were up to Triple H, WWE NXT would air live every week. Financially though that is not a smart move nor in the cards.

– Dave Meltzer asked him about Kenta and Prince Devitt. Trips replied, “Who?” Meltzer started explaining before Trips told him he was just joking. I thought it was funny but it was a bit awkward. Anyway, Triple H had no answer when it came to plans for either guy.

– Triple H said that Vince believes they have created their own brand in NXT and was impressed with the buzz they got last time around.

– Cesaro loves working NXT and would work there as often as he could. Triple H said that he told Cesaro now that Cesaro is a bigger part of the plans, he will be less available to work in NXT.

– Regarding Tough Enough, they would like to film it at the WWE Developmental Center but nothing is confirmed.

– He is very excited about the transitions from NXT to the main roster, and put over Bray Wyatt quite a bit here. He did say that just because something does well in NXT doesn’t mean that it will work on the main roster.

– He cited HIPPA laws when he refused to give any comment on Christian or Rey Mysterio’s conditions.

– He said that he believes in Tyson Kidd, giving him a vote of confidence.

– He said the NXT roster is very supportive of each other.

– He said that Charlotte is starting to get confidence.

Those were the highlights. I will say that Triple H seemed to enjoy the call and was very friendly and professional to everyone. While I am sure he did some dancing, he seemed sincere and honest in his answers, even saying he didn’t know regarding some questions. He has plenty of haters, yet it’s hard to bash him when you hear him in this kind of environment.

WWE NXT Takeover airs Thursday night live on the WWE Network. The first NXT special was my favorite show of the year thus far. I loved it! I hope this one is just as good or better. On paper it has a heck of a chance of tearing down the house.

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The NXT Day: WWE’s Stepping Stone Has Some Hurdles

May 01, 2014 By: Category: WWE | Pro Wrestling

Among the sights and sounds of 2014, the most indelible is perhaps the city of Pittsburgh rejecting the 2014 Royal Rumble match like a poorly-matched kidney transplant. With no Daniel Bryan in sight after Rey Mysterio entered thirtieth, nearly 16,000 fans booed as though Donald Sterling was doing open mic at the Apollo.

While Bryan is deified by fans of all walks, backgrounds, tastes, and viewership levels, his core group will always be the internet wrestling community, or IWC. His loudest supporters will be the ones who watched him in those bingo halls and rec-centers that Michael Cole harped upon a few years back. Fans who followed him on his journey toward becoming Ring of Honor World Champion remain the backbone of the grassroots leviathan that is his superstar celebrity.

Bryan’s not alone. CM Punk, Cesaro, Seth Rollins, Dean Ambrose, and even Luke Harper, for their renowned indy exploits, have built-in fanbases that cheered them on in gymnasiums and lodges on Saturday nights. The same can be said for the ECW contingent of years past: Rob Van Dam, Tommy Dreamer, and Paul Heyman still get residual cheers from anyone that’s ever pronounced ‘W’ as ‘dub’ whenever they appear on the national stage.

It’s the ‘hipster’ effect. Hip-to-the-room fans will gladly tell you “I liked Cesaro when he was Claudio Castagnoli,” in much the same way some snot, wearing thick glasses he doesn’t really need, will scoff at your Green Day shirt, telling you it was all downhill artistically after Dookie.

In other words, they liked that wrestler before it was cool to like them.

Grant you, not every weekend connoisseur with discriminating taste is as snide as the stereotype listed. There is, however, a common thread among every variety of indy geek: loyalty.

It’s because a segment of the audience remembers Bryan kicking people into oblivion at the Murphy Rec Center that they carry on and cheer him today. Same with Claudio Castagnoli’s “Kings of Wrestling” days with Chris Hero, and Dean Ambrose’s out-on-a-limb speeches as Jon Moxley. Other WWE developmental talents have been plucked from more obscure places based on the fact that they’re 6’5 and look hulking in a Speedo (Mason Ryan was reportedly given a *five*-year deal with WWE after just wrestling for two years in less reputable promotions; he spent the summer of 2011 nearly killing Dolph Ziggler with ugly press slams).

Like Ryan, many heavyweights WWE’s filled their developmental program with have come in without impressive resumes. This is hardly news; the notion is that like many Divas, they have the body and the image, and WWE can just teach them that pesky wrestling stuff later.

As such, those like Mason Ryan come in without built-in fanfare like Bryan and Punk. They start behind the blocks and, once overpushed to the office’s content, they oftentimes develop a fan resentment that doesn’t wash off. While the indy darling is sustained, the musclehead bad ass of the future spins its wheels in a mudslide backlash.

This changed about a year and a half ago, when Hulu Plus began airing the revamped NXT development group. From there, The Shield and The Wyatt Family debuted to relative acclaim (though the latter had some impressive vignettes spurring crowd sentiment).

Sure, many loyalists remembered Ambrose and Rollins as Moxley and Black, but even immovable stonewall Roman Reigns had a measure of cred. Consistent booking has buoyed all six men, but having scores of fans ‘in the know’ about them has played a part in that consistent booking: WWE knows that the demand is there.

More than ever with NXT on WWE Network, in the neighborhood of 700,000 subscribers, more people can get on the bandwagons before the wheels begin turning. The audience is there; since NXT Arrival in February, TNA Impact’s dropped out of the Top 100 most watched shows on several Thursdays. Wonder what the cause is? Well, besides their own product.

Seeing the smark-heavy post-WrestleMania Raw crowd go insane for Paige’s victorious debut over AJ, roaring when her name appeared on the Titan Tron, shows the power of the faux-indy brand. At the same time, there’s a weakness to having NXT so prominently available to a larger audience.

Emma would be the prime example of this issue. In NXT, Emma’s character was in many ways what you see now: an oblivious oddity who enjoys herself, despite her awkward mannerisms sticking out like a sore thumb. Punctuated by the swim-thrust arm movements and the soap-bubble entrance, she’s well-received by the NXT cult audience.

For the most part, in spite of her quirkiness, Emma bowls over opponents with impeccable wrestling ability (similar to what Eugene was supposed to be in 2004). On the main WWE roster, however, the creative has put more spotlight on her weird side, as you might suspect, and that gets much more emphasis. When Emma produced her own pink Cobra sock on the April 21 RAW, as part of her ‘peas in a pod’ parternship with Santino Marella, you could literally hear the groans from the crowd. WWE creative’s watered down the nuances, as is their tendency.

It hasn’t been a productive three months on the big stage for Emma. Is her gimmick too ‘small time’ for the contemporary audience? Perhaps, but it could also be a harsh lesson: NXT’s best and brightest may crash and burn under WWE’s brightest lights.

ECW fans loathed what ‘ECW 2006′ had become, an affront to the underground chaos they relished. Large chunks of the audience will verbally fight back if they feel Bryan and Punk are wronged (some crowds still chant Punk’s name out of spite). With NXT getting more eyeballs on it, will more transfers to the main roster go smoothly? If not, will there be accumulated backlash?

Adam Rose’s Russell Brand-lite act is headed for a call-up; what will happen if that bombs? What if The Ascension flunks in a program with The Usos? Better yet, what happens if Sami Zayn is relegated to being midcard fodder, “Ole Ole” chants be damned?

NXT is essentially a Triple H investment. The next few talents to debut (and yes, Bo Dallas is among them) need to be impactful. Otherwise, NXT will mean less and less if the ‘stars of tomorrow’ symbolize a tomorrow that never comes.

Justin Henry has been an occasional contributor to Camel Clutch Blog since 2009. His other work can be found at WrestleCrap.com and ColdHardFootballFacts.com. He can be found on Twitter, so give him a follow.

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